Prisoner of conscience Arash Sadeghi Warns in Open Letter: Iranian Authorities Kill Opponents Abroad

Posted on: August 8th, 2018

Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA) – Arash Sadeghi, a civil rights activist imprisoned in Karaj’s notorious Rajai Shahr Prison, has written an open letter following the assassination of Eqbal Moradi, a political activist in Iraqi Kurdistan and the father of political prisoner Zanyar Moradi. Mr Sadeghi points out the history of the Islamic Republic’s assassination campaigns inside and outside the country, ongoing since February 1979.

As HRANA had previously reported, the dead body of Eqbal Moradi was found in Penjwen, a district of Iraqi Kurdistan which shares a border with Iran. He had been reportedly killed with three bullets. It wasn’t the first time that an attempt was made on his life.

HRANA has published the full text of Arash Sadeghi’s letter and its English translation below:

The campaign to eliminate critics inside and outside the country started in the very month of February 1979. It claimed the lives of hundreds of people associated with the previous regime in addition to Sunnis, Baha’is, dissidents and members of revolutionary political groups which were critical of the new regime. It continued during the vast oppression of the 1980’s and the mass murder of political prisoners in summer 1988. After the [Iran/Iraq] war ended, it continued with the campaign of assassinations (known as ‘Chain Murders’) which targeted the regime’s critics and opponents.

The blacklist of assassinations includes many names: Mohammad Mokhtari, Dariush Forouhar, Parvaneh Eskandari, Mohammad Jafar Pooyandeh, Ali Akbar Sirjani, Pirooz Davani, Hamid and Karoon Hajizadeh, Masoumeh Mossadegh, Zohreh Izadi and dozens of other dissidents.

But the assassination wasn’t limited to critics and dissidents inside the country. In the last four decades, It has also targeted dozens of opposition figures in European countries.

Shahriar Shafiq, Ashraf Pahlavi’s son, was the first to be killed in Paris in December, 1979. He had been previously convicted of “Corruption on earth” [a capital crime in Iran] in an absentee trial chaired by Sadeq Khalkhali [notorious judge of the early revolutionary period.]

Abdolrahman Ghassemloo and Abdollah Ghaderi were assassinated in Vienna, Austria during a negotiation with the diplomats of the Islamic Republic.

Gholam Keshavarz was killed in Cyprus, Sedigh Kamangar in Ranya, Iraq and Kazem Rajavi in Switzerland.

Efat Ghazi [married to a prominent Kurdish activist and daughter of the President of the short-lived Kurdish autonomous republic in Iran] was assassinated in Vasteras, Sweden.

Abdolrahman Boroumand and Shapour Bakhtiar were killed in France.

Fereydoun Farrokhzad was assassinated in Bonn, Germany.

Mohammad Sadegh Sharafkandi, Fattah Abdoli, Homayoun Ardalan and Noori Dehkordi were assassinated in a restaurant called Mykonos in Berlin. Then there was the bombing of the Jewish community center in Argentina…

Based on the statements of the German prosecutors, the campaign of assassinations abroad was led by the [Iranian] regime’s top political personalities, right up to the Mykonos assassinations. And it was only after the trial and the diplomatic crisis with European countries that the campaign came to a brief pause.

The ‘chain murders’ had started right after the 1988 [mass] executions. It was only in the Khatami era, because of a slightly more open media atmosphere, that public opinion became sensitive to the murders. Ultimately, it was declared that the murders had been carried out by high-ranking security officials (chiefly, Sayid Emami)…(But, from the autumn 1998 and onward, the murders continued and they didn’t stop until the early 2000’s.)

“The campaign of assassinations abroad has been re-activated. One has to be alarmed. The campaign has accelerated.”

This time around they targeted Eqbal Moradi. We heard the shocking and bitter news of Eqbal’s death – he is the father of Zanyar Moradi, a political prisoner convicted to death. [Eqbal] Moradi was active in the city of Penjwen and did human rights work. He was actively working with several human rights bodies, including the International Campaign of No To Executions and getting financial help to political prisoners and their families.

Rare is the human rights activist who hasn’t heard of Eqbal Moradi. I got to know him years ago and saw what he did for his dear son and nephew (Loqman Moradi) and all political prisoners. When Zanyar was 19 he was taken as a hostage together with his cousin, Loqman, just because the security apparatus held a grudge against his father.

Zanyar and Loqman were convicted to death without a fair trial. It is now 10 years since they’ve been in prison. Here is an obvious sign of injustice in the trial of Zanyar (a man who I consider to be a symbol of resistance and honor): When there were witnesses ready to testify to their innocence, the judge who is but a rubber-stamp for the security apparatus refused to accept their testimonies without giving any legal reasons.

Here is an obvious sign of injustice: They are hostages in a cruel and evil plot of the security apparatus.

And now the father is gone and his death sounds the alarm of the re-start of the assassination campaign in Iraqi Kurdistan.

The re-activation of the assignation campaign in the Iraqi Kurdistan should be seen as being rooted in the nature of this regime’s confrontation with the opposition; they consider the physical elimination of critics and opponents to be legitimate based on the expediencies of the regime and religious law. In the last year, four more Kurdish activists have been assassinated in Iraqi Kurdistan in addition to Ahmad Mawlana Abu Nahez, known as Ahmad Neysi, an Ahwazi activist who was assassinated in the Netherlands.

Unfortunately, ever since the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) was founded, it lacked a strong and independent government and it suffered from divisions between the main parties and the political-military presence of neighboring countries, especially the Islamic Republic, whose Hamzeh Base, centered in Urmia [Iranian city close to the border with Iraq] works on behalf of the Quds Force to run the assassination campaign abroad. This has made Iraqi Kurdistan an easy target.

Some countries are silent about the strategy of accusations and some others go along with it, officially and unofficially. This means that the current Iranian regime will not only increase its human rights violations inside the country, it will also work on elevating its opponents abroad with more ease.

This puts a heavy burden on the officials of European countries.

In recent years, they’ve sent thousands of their citizens to countries such as Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan to show how serious they are in fighting state terrorism and human rights violation.

Western officials do not have the right to use the excuse of economic and trade interests to be silent about those who plan and execute state-led assassinations, the very people who also suppress opponents inside Iran. Any kind of silence or cooperation with the Islamic Republic officials encourages the continuation of domestic oppression and threats against the opposition abroad.

Arash Sadeghi
Wednesday, August 1, 2018
Gohardasht [Rajai Shahr] Prison, Karaj

Iran: Suicide rate up 5% in 2017 compared to previous Year

Posted on: August 6th, 2018

Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA) – According to the World Health Organization (WHO) statistics in 2017, nearly “800 000 people die due to suicide every year”.
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports the rate of attempted suicide higher among women than men; however, four times as many men die due to suicide than women.

Iran’s Suicide Rate: Iran, the state-run newspaper, reports that between five to seven people per every 100,000 commit suicide in Iran.

According to the Iranian National Coroner Office, the suicide rate in Iran increased by 5% between *March 2017 and March 2018 compared to the twelve months before that period. A rise of such magnitude may not seem alarming, but once the statistics are assessed in more detail, the figures are shocking.

Despite no recorded or accurate statistics on adolescence suicide in Iran, multiple reports in recent years indicate that suicide is not exclusive to adults (18+ years old). An increasing number of children and teenagers as young as 10, 12, and 15 years of age are committing suicide as a result of feeling hopeless about resolving their emotional distress and other issues in their lives.

Iran Newspaper reports that the increase in suicide among children and teenagers in Iran is alarming. Women, men, adolescents and children commit suicide for a variety of reasons, most of which have economic roots. Other reasons include heartache caused by a romantic relationship, academic failure, inability to contain and control emotions and feelings, psychological problems, substance abuse, domestic violence and genetic predisposition.

—-

* The rates cited in this article correspond to the Iranian solar calendar which starts on March 21st (or the first day of spring) and follows the Zodiac months.

Report: New Wave of Mass Protests in Iran

Posted on: August 5th, 2018

Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA) –  A new wave of widespread protests that began on Tuesday, continued across Iran through the week for six days. Protesters included merchants, shopkeepers and other citizens who gathered in objection to the worsening economic conditions in Iran. Their main concerns were centered around the issues of unemployment and the rising of prices and exchange rates. Rising prices, inflation, and unemployment have led to protests since December 2017.


First Day of Protests
Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Protests in Isfahan on Shapur Jadid Street began with a strike by merchants and shopkeepers, which led to other citizens joining in on the protest. The gathering quickly turned violent when security forces attempted to disperse the crowd with tear gas and gunshots.

In Karaj, people gathered in Gohardasht Square to hold a protest rally. According to reports, many women participated. Some protesters were reportedly arrested by security and plainclothes forces and are currently held at a Basij-operated center in the Gohardasht neighborhood.

Second Day of Protests
Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Protests in Rasht and Shiraz were accompanied by the heavy presence of security forces. Some of the videos from Shiraz indicate that a 7-year-old was shot with tear gas by police forces.

Protesters in these burned tires on the streets to counter the effects of tear gas and chanted slogans including “Our enemy is right here, they are lying claiming it’s the U.S.”, “Guns and tanks are no longer effective, mullahs should get lost,” “No to Gaza, no to Lebanon — I give my life only for Iran,” “The nation begs while *He acts like he’s God” and “Down with high prices”.

Mass protests also occurred in Isfahan and Karaj.

Third Day of Protests
Thursday, August 2, 2018

Protests were reported in twelve Iranian cities: Isfahan, Shahinshahr, Najafabad, Karaj, Mashhad, Shiraz, Sari, Tehran, Ahvaz, Kermanshah, Qahderijan and Arak.

Peaceful protests turned violent in Isfahan and Shiraz when security, plainclothes and Basij forces shot at the protesters with guns and tear gas. In the videos from Thursday, protesters are seen throwing rocks at the Iranian authorities in response to the gunshots. Protesters are also seen starting fires in order to counter the effects of the tear gas.

Many protesters were reportedly arrested in Mashhad and Shiraz.

Fourth Day of Protests 
Friday, August 3, 2018

Protests occurred in five different cities: Karaj, Qahderijan, Tehran, Qazvin and Kermanshah.

Fifth Day of Protests 
Saturday, August 4, 2018

Since the early hours of Saturday, a strong presence of security forces had created an ambience of intimidation in many of the Iranian cities. Reports indicate that large protests were held in the central city of Qom, Karaj and Tehran.

People were heard chanting “Iranians, it is time to demand your rights from this regime”, “Down with the dictator”, “Don’t let fear conquer, we are all together”, “The nation begs while He acts like he’s God”.

Some reports claim that 50 of the female protesters were arrested in recent days and transferred to the quarantine ward in *Varamin’s Garchak Prison.

Many of the state-run media or news agencies with ties to the government have either denied the existence of protests or play them down as rallies incited by opposition or simply gatherings with strictly syndical demands.

The police forces in the cities of Mahdasht and Gohardasht (both located in the Alborz province) imposed restrictions on traffic and banned driving after 6PM in these areas.

Reports from sources close to security institutions, one person was shot dead in Karaj and at least 20 others were wounded.

Ali Hendiani, the director of the seminary in Eshtehard county, said: “Protesters threw stones at the seminary building and broke the prayer room’s windows…These people were dispersed by the anti-riot security forces, and the police have identified them and are on the search for them. Some have been arrested, and the mission to find the other protesters continues.”

Sixth Day of Protests 
Sunday, August 5, 2018

Despite the persistence of security measures and the heavy presence of security forces aimed at intimidating citizens, protests were held in the city of Kazerun (located in the Fars province).

There are reports that protesters attempted to rally in Shiraz (capital of the Fars province), Tehran, Karaj and Qom, but strong police presence prevented these rallies from taking shape.

 

Mobile Services Cut Off

Subscribers of Irancell, an Iranian telecommunication service provider, reported that mobile services in parts of central Tehran and the city of Zanjan were interrupted. Some of the clients of Operator Network, another cell phone service provider, reported that they received a message regarding a temporary and nation-wide interruption to their service. It is not yet clear whether this stoppage is part of the Iranian security apparatus’ attempt to control the protests. In previous protests, there was precedence in taking such measures to curb protests.

Protester Death

Reza Shakarami, General Prosecutor for the Alborz province, denied reports attributed to him about the death of a young man from Karaj during a night protest. “The shooting [leading to the protester’s death] and the circumstances surrounding it are under investigation. Any quote cited from me regarding the murder of the victim by the rioters or any other individual is denied,” he said. The victim referred to by Mr. Shakarami was identified on social media as Reza Otadi.

Salman Samani, the Interior Ministry spokesperson, has reacted to online invitations to assemble. “In the last month, dozens of invitations and calls to protest rising prices, inflation and living conditions have been widely distributed. The source of the majority of such calls is outside Iran, but the invitations have been reposted and shared by people inside Iran,” he said.

Reactions from Iranian Authorities

Ali Motahari, Member of Parliament for Tehran, told a state-run newspaper that the authorities are trying hard to resolve the issues [the protesters have voiced their concerns about], and if the people wait and be patient a few more months, the conditions will improve. He also blamed certain movements who made attempts for the Iran Nuclear Deal to fail and whose actions paved the way for a Trump presidency, the pretext to withdraw from the **Deal.

Meanwhile, Kheirollah Tarkhani, a security official in the Alborz province, stated: “We have been trying to appease the protesters and listen to them. However, we have realized that their protests are not about economic demands and are aimed at the political structure. The small, scattered protests are not the sum of the people’s economic grievances and demands.”

——
* Reference to Iranian Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei
** Gharchark is a women’s prison south east of Tehran; reports point to prisoners facing deplorable conditions in this prison (https://www.en-hrana.org/comprehensive-report-womens-ward-evin-prison)
*** Ali Motahari is implicitly referring to the Revolutionary Guards commanders and some hardliners whose interference in neighboring countries coupled with their push for an aggressive missile program created the conditions for Trump’s withdrawal from the JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, aka Iran Nuclear Deal)

Iranian Parliament Deputy Immune from Prosecution Despite Accusations of Sexual Assault

Posted on: June 25th, 2018

Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA) – Based on evidence, documents and testimonials HRANA has obtained from reliable sources, there are at least two new allegations of multiple counts of sexual harassment and assault against Salman Khodadadi, a current Member of Iran’s Parliament and the Chair of the Parliament’s Social Committee. Mr. Khodadadi was previously accused of sexual harassment and assault and was detained on the charge of raping his secretary and a visitor to his office. Mr. Khodadadi held the position of MP and was a member of the Parliament’s National Security Committee and Health Committee from 1996 to 2012. However, in 2012, Iran’s Ministry of Interior barred Mr. Khodadadi from running for Parliament. The Guardian Council reversed the ban in 2016 and allowed him to return as a member of Parliament the same year. In 2014, while Mr. Khodadadi was barred from the Parliament, he was appointed an adviser to Iran’s Foreign Minister, Javad Zarif.  

A 28-year-old woman who has asked to be identified as “Z.N.” broke her silence to HRANA. She claims to be a victim of Mr. Khodadadi and that he abused his position of power. Ms. Z.N. claims Mr. Khodadadi sexually assaulted and harassed her for four years. She tells HRANA that she knew Mr. Khodadadi through her father who was Mr. Khodadadi’s colleague in the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC). After her father’s death, Ms. Z.N. says she was searching for a job due to her mother’s illness and their difficult financial situation.

“One day, I went to the Governor’s office to seek help. I was informed that Mr. Khodadadi would be coming there to listen to the people’s problems. Mr. Khodadadi received my letter and told me to contact him. When I did, he said that he would help me gain a position with the Audit Court.”  

According to Ms. Z.N., she followed up with that promise and Mr. Khodadadi invited her to Tehran. Ms. Z.N. says she went with her mother on her first visit but they left without receiving any results. Ms. Z.N. says Mr. Khodadadi contacted her again and advised her to return to Tehran but alone this time. Once in Tehran, Ms. Z.N. allegedly attempted to track Mr. Khodadadi down until she was finally instructed to meet him at his office.

“Once in his office, he locked the door and raped me. He warned me to not tell anyone. I will never forget that day. It was as though the whole world came crashing down on me. My muscles were locked up and I felt paralyzed. He told me I had to leave immediately because a few of his colleagues were coming to see him. I asked him whether his intention was just to rape me, instead of helping me and my family. He replied that he wanted to help and have sex with me too. I left his office and headed to the train station to return home. On the way back, all kinds of thoughts crossed my mind and I even contemplated suicide, but because of my family and their situation, I decided to keep silent…He contacted me after the incident under different pretexts and managed to get me to come to his residential home in Tabriz where he raped me again.”

“After a long period of intimidation and enticement by Mr. Khodadadi, I finally called him to tell him that I didn’t want the job anymore. I told him to leave me alone or else I would file a complaint against him. He replied that I could not do a damn thing to him and hung up the phone on me. After a while he called me back and said that he likes me and wants to talk to me. I did not accept and didn’t go see him. He was even sending me threatening messages that if I didn’t go see him, he would hurt me. I still did not go, and out of fear for my life, I constantly moved residences.”

Ms. Z.N. claims that Mr. Khodadadi had more than one victim. “Some time later, I was with friends when I heard from one of them that Mr. Khodadadi had promised her a job as well and then raped her. This friend wanted to commit suicide on several occasions. That is when I understood that I was not the only victim, but none of the victims are prepared to file a complaint out of fear for their lives.”

“I waited for some time so that he would stop his harassment, but to no avail. I finally called him and begged him to leave me alone or I would tell everyone about what happened. He replied that if I say anything he would have me killed. I was very afraid. I took a train to Tehran and decided to go to the committee responsible for the supervision of MPs. I did not know how to access this committee so I went to the Parliament’ security and told them. First, they did not listen to me until I threatened to go to the Guardian Council. Finally, they accepted to consider my story but said that I would need to provide proof. I told them that I have voice and SMS messages containing threats.”

Mr. Khodadadi allegedly contacted Ms. Z.N. several times after the complaint was filed and said that if she did not withdraw her complaint that he would harm her.

“I told him that I will go through with my complaint because it was my right. He contacted me several more times and told me to visit him to resolve the problem. Again, he promised me a job and pledged to make everything right if I withdraw my complaint. I refused…Since April 2018, when I filed my complaint, I have contacted the Parliament’s security department multiple times, but each time they tell me that they need more time to investigate.”  

HRANA has obtained a copy of the documents in Ms. Z.N.’s case, including the threatening remarks made by Mr. Khodadadi. HRANA will consider releasing the documents publicly, but will first consider the victim’s safety and the progress made with the legal proceedings.

Salman Khodadadi’s Background:

Salman Khodadadi was born in 1962 and was recruited by the Islamic Republic’s security apparatus in his youth. During the 1980s purge of political dissidents he was working in the East Azerbaijan Intelligence office. He made an unsuccessful run for Parliament in the early 1990s but was appointed as Director of Ardabil’s Intelligence Bureau and later as the IRGC commander in Malekan.

In the sixth Parliament (2000-2004), Mr. Khodadadi was a member of the Parliament’s Health Committee, despite having no background in that field. Toward the end of his third term in Parliament, he was summoned to court on charges of moral corruption and engaging in illicit relationships, after two women pressed charges against him. He was released on bail. Since he had been elected for a fourth term to the Parliament and was sworn in as a Parliament Deputy, his case was closed.

When two women MPs raised objections regarding Mr. Khodadadi’s credentials, his case was sent to the Parliament for further investigation. Although some of the people of Malekan had gathered in front of the Parliament demanding Khodadai’s ousting, the Parliament voted to approve his credentials and allowed him to serve his term. Mr. Khodadadi refused to comment on his case citing ongoing investigation and his reluctance to provide material for enemies and foreign media.

In the parliamentary election that followed, Mr. Khodadadi was barred from running. However, due to his membership in the 1990s in the National Security Committee, he had a close relationship with Hassan Rouhani, the current President of Iran, and other current members of Mr. Rouhani’s cabinet. Mr. Khodadadi supported Mr. Rouhani in the 2013 Presidential election and was being considered for the position of Governor of Bushehr (Iranian southern province). Mr. Rouhani later changed his mind and Mr. Khodadadi was appointed an advisor to Javad Zarif.

In the most recent parliamentary elections, Mr. Khodadadi was once again barred from running for Parliament by the Supervisory Council (operated by the Executive Branch), but the Guardian Council lobbied on his behalf and he was elected one more time.  Mr. Khodadadi had the support of the “Omid List”, a list of candidates aligned with Mr. Rouhani. Once in Parliament, Mr. Khodadadi became the Chair of the Parliament’s Social Committee.

When he first began to serve in the Parliament, Salman Khodadadi was a management studies student. During his many terms in the Parliament, he received a Master’s degree in Political Science and a PhD in International Relations.

Iran Annual Human Rights Report, 2017

Posted on: January 1st, 2018

This leaflet contains the 2017’s analytical and statistical annual report on the human rights in Iran, prepared by the Department of Statistics and Publications of Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI). This statistic analysis report presented by HRAI is the result of the daily efforts of this organization and its dedicated members as part of a daily statistic and census project that started in 2009 by this organization.

This annual report on human rights violations in Iran ( Jan 1 2017 – Dec 15 2017) is the collection, analysis, and documentation of 2889 reports concerning human rights, gathered from various news sources during 2017.

The following 41-pages includes statistical overviews and related charts on various sections regarding women’s rights, children’s rights, prisoners’ rights and etc. based on this report, despite the 10% decrease in human rights violations reports in provinces other than Tehran, compared to the last year’s annual report, there is still a major concern on lack of proper reporting and monitoring of the human rights situation by the civil society in the smaller cities.

This report is the result of endeavours made by courageous human rights activists in Iran who pay a very high cost for the realization of their humanitarian believes. However for obvious reasons (i.e. existing governmental limitations and ban on the free exchange of information and government preventing the existence of human right organizations in the country), this report by no means is free of errors and cannot alone be a reflection on the actual status of human right in Iran. However, it should be emphasized that this report is considered as one of the most accurate, comprehensive and authentic reports on the human rights conditions in Iran and it can serve as a very informative source of information for human rights activists and organizations working on Iran, to better understand the challenges and opportunities that they may face.

Download the report

Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI)

Department of Statistics and Publications

December 30 2017

[email protected]

‘With Empty Hands But Deep Beliefs,’ Jamal Hosseini Lost His Life Fighting for Human Rights in Iran

Posted on: August 5th, 2017

Activism against repressive governments can often come with life-changing risks. Prison, torture, censorship and exile. Leaving behind your family and the country you call home, only to face the alienation and loneliness of life as a political refugee.

The decision to speak out may have cost Iranian human rights activist Seyed Jamal Hosseini his life. (more…)

Comprehensive 2016 Iran Human Rights Report

Posted on: February 6th, 2017

This leaflet contains the 2016’s analytical and statistical annual report on the human rights in Iran, prepared by the Department of Statistics and Publications of Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI). This statistic analysis report presented by HRAI is the result of the daily efforts of this organization and its dedicated members as part of a daily statistic and census project that started in 2009 by this organization.

Download report in PDF format

This annual report on human rights violations in Iran (2016) is the collection, analysis, and documentation of 3439 reports concerning human rights, gathered from various news sources during 2016. Human Right Activists News Agency (HRANA) has gathered and reported 28%, official or close to the Iranian government sources 63% and other human rights news agencies 9% of all the reports analyzed in this Annual Report.

The following 31-pages includes statistical overviews and related charts on various sections regarding women’s rights, children’s rights, prisoners’ rights and etc. based on this report, despite the 4% increase in human rights violations reports in provinces other than Tehran, compared to the last year’s annual report, there is still a major concern on lack of proper reporting and monitoring of the human rights situation by the civil society in the smaller cities.

This report is the result of endeavors made by courageous human rights activists in Iran who pay a very high cost for the realization of their humanitarian beliefs. However, for obvious reasons (i.e. existing governmental limitations and ban on the free exchange of information and government preventing the existence of human right organizations in the country), this report by no means is free of errors and cannot alone be a reflection on the actual status of human right in Iran. However, it should be emphasized that this report is considered as one of the most accurate, comprehensive and authentic reports on the human rights conditions in Iran and it can serve as a very informative source of information for human rights activists and organizations working on Iran, to better understand the challenges and opportunities that they may face.

Download the report

Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI)

Department of Statistics and Publications

January 2017

[email protected]

Human Rights Situation in Iran – Annual Report 1393

Posted on: October 15th, 2015
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Click for Download the full report in PDF version

Human Rights Situation in Iran – Annual Report 1393 (Persian Calendar)

The Department of Statistics and Publications of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI) of Iran has published its sixth annual report on the human rights situation in Iran. This report concerns the events and human rights incidents occurred in Iran over the course of one-year period (2014-2015). These reports have been collected by the HRAI reporters and associated organizations in addition to the reports published by the state media, unofficial media, and international resources. This report highlights some of the most important human rights incidents in Iran in 2014, which could be useful for the human rights activists and researchers. The names of the executed political prisoners or those awaiting the execution decree as well as arrested individuals in different categories are also included in this report.

Click here for donwload the full report in PDF format

Video Footage of Clashes between the People and Police in Fars Province

Posted on: July 11th, 2015

HRANA News Agency – The following video reports the clashed between the citizens and police force in the commercial market of Dehsheikh, in Lamerd, Fars province.

According to a number of businessmen of Dehsheikh, Police Special Forces attacked the commercial market of Dehsheikh to collect smuggled goods, on Saturday 4th July. Witnesses say police’s behavior scared shopkeepers and passers-by, which eventually led to clashes between police and a group of people. Witnesses say tear gases were used in the clashes with protesters and protesters also attacked by throwing stones at the security forces. (more…)

Human Rights Situation in Iran – Annual Report 2014

Posted on: April 6th, 2015

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HRANA News Agency – The Department of Statistics and Publications of the Human Rights Activists in Iran has published an analytical report on the human rights situation in Iran during the one-year period (2014-2015). This report is the result of daily efforts of the organization and its dedicated members in the past few years based on a survey-based project started in 2009 and indicated as statistical analysis on this report.

The report consists of statistics in different areas of human rights violations in Iran e.g. ethnic rights, religious rights, freedom of expression, executions etc.

It also includes the statistics of human rights violations in different provinces in Iran as well as a general comparison with the statistics of the last year.

The Department of Statistics and Publications of the Human Rights Activists in Iran has included different monthly comparative figures in the report, through which you can have an overview of the whole situation in different time frames.

The report can be downloaded here.