Appeals Court Upholds One-Year Sentence for Amir Sheibani Zaveh Linked to 2022 Nationwide Protests

The Appeals Court of Razavi Khorasan Province has upheld the one-year sentence against Amir Sheibani Zaveh, citing his involvement in the 2022 nationwide protests.

The initial verdict, issued by the Mashhad Revolutionary Court and presided over by Judge Hadi Mansouri, found Sheibani Zaveh guilty of “propaganda against the regime.” In addition to the one-year imprisonment, he faces a two-year travel ban and two years of restrictions on Internet and social media use.

A source close to Sheibani Zaveh’s family, who spoke to HRANA, revealed that the charge was based on his communication with the families of protestors injured or killed by regime forces during the 2022 nationwide protests.

Sheibani Zaveh was apprehended by security forces in Mashhad in late October 2022 and remained in detention for a period. In January 2023, he received a sentence of eight years and six months, which was later nullified following his inclusion in the “general pardon and commutation” directive.

About the 2022 Nationwide Protests

The arrest of Mahsa Amini by Tehran Morality Police for her improper hejab and her suspicious death on September 16 sparked protests sweeping across Iran. During the nationwide protests, about 19600 people, including journalists, artists, lawyers, teachers, students, and civil rights activists, were arrested.

Baha’i Citizen Hourieh Sadat Mohseni Receives Four-Year Prison Sentence

The Court of Appeals in Razavi Khorasan Province has recently sentenced Hourieh Sadat Mohseni, a Baha’i resident of Mashhad, to four years in prison.

A reliable source has confirmed this development to HRANA, revealing that Mohseni received three years for “membership in groups and communities to act against national security” and an additional year for “spreading propaganda against the regime.”

According to Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, Mohseni is set to serve three years in prison for the first charge.

The initial verdict was issued by the Revolutionary Court of Mashhad, led by Hadi Mansouri, in December 2023. The source reports that Mohseni’s private lawyer was not accepted by the Revolutionary Court, and the verdict was swiftly issued upon taking over the case. Earlier, her lawyer, Mohammad-Hadi Erfainian Kaseb, had conveyed the court’s rejection of his legal representation.

Mohseni was indicted on November 11, 2023, and was subsequently released on bail. This is not the first instance of arrest and conviction she has faced.

Baha’is are subjected to violations of their religious rights, comprising 82% of reports on infringements against religious minorities, according to HRA’s 2023 annual report.

The Baha’i faith is not recognized as a legitimate religion by Iranian authorities, leading to systematic and longstanding violations of the rights of Baha’is in the country. This includes the denial of their fundamental right to practice their religion, which constitutes a clear breach of both Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Baha’i Women Upheld with Three Years and Eight Months Sentence on Appeal

The Court of Appeal in Razavi Khorasan Province has affirmed the three-year, eight-month sentence for each of Baha’i citizens Golnoosh Nasiri and Farideh Moradi.

According to a source close to these women, who confirmed the news to HRANA, the verdict includes three years for “membership in groups to act against national security” and eight months for “spreading propaganda against the regime.”

The initial judgment was issued by the Mashhad Revolutionary Court, presided over by Judge Hadi Mansouri, during a court session held on October 11, 2023.

Their investigation procedures took place in late August 2023, during which each was granted bail with five billion tomans, approximately equivalent to 100,000 dollars.

Baha’is are subjected to violations of their religious rights, comprising 82% of reports on infringements against religious minorities, according to HRA’s 2023 annual report.

The Baha’i faith is not recognized as a legitimate religion by Iranian authorities, leading to systematic and longstanding violations of the rights of Baha’is in the country. This includes the denial of their fundamental right to practice their religion, which constitutes a clear breach of both Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Baha’i Citizen Shohreh Salekian Sentenced to Three Years and Eight Months in Prison

The Mashhad Revolutionary Court has issued a three-year and eight-month prison sentence to Baha’i citizen Shohreh Salekian.

Presiding Judge Hadi Mansouri determined Salekian’s sentence, attributing three years for “membership in groups to disturb order and act against national security” and an additional eight months for “spreading propaganda against the regime.”

In the event of an appeal, Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code stipulates that, in cases involving multiple charges, the most severe penalty shall be applied. Consequently, if the verdict is contested, Salekian will serve a three-year term.

Legal proceedings against Salekian commenced in July of this year following her summons to Mashhad Courthouse.

HRANA’s annual report has highlighted a concerning trend where, in 2022, 64.63% of reported human rights violations against religious minorities are directed toward the Baha’i community.

The Baha’i faith is not recognized as a legitimate religion by Iranian authorities, leading to systematic and longstanding violations of the rights of Baha’is in the country. This includes the denial of their fundamental right to practice their religion, which constitutes a clear breach of both Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Baha’i Citizen Rouya Malakooti Receives Six-Year, Eight-Month Sentence

The Mashhad Revolutionary Court, presided over by Judge Hadi Mansouri, has handed down a six-year, eight-month prison sentence to Baha’i Citizen Rouya Malakooti.

The verdict includes a six-year term for “forming groups to act against national security” and an additional eight months for “spreading propaganda against the regime.”

In the event the verdict is upheld on appeal, Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code mandates the enforcement of the initial six-year prison term.

Malakooti, along with eight other Baha’i women, was summoned to appear in Mashhad on July 29. While all were called, only Malakooti was arrested and subsequently jailed in Vakilabad Prison after an extensive interrogation.

The 2022 annual report by HRANA underscores a troubling trend, revealing that 64.63% of reported human rights violations against religious minorities target the Baha’i community.

The Baha’i faith faces persistent discrimination in Iran, as it is not officially recognized by the authorities. This systemic injustice results in consistent violations of the Baha’is’ fundamental right to practice their religion, a direct violation of Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant explicitly guarantees every person the right to freedom of religion, freedom to change their religion, and freedom of expression, individually or collectively, openly or in private.

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Two Baha’i Women Receive Prison Sentences in Mashhad

Golnoosh Nasiri and Farideh Moradi, both Baha’i citizens, have been sentenced to three years and eight months in prison by the Mashhad Revolutionary Court.

Judge Hadi Mansouri issued this verdict on October 26, which allocates three years for “membership in a group with intentions against national security” and eight months for “spreading propaganda against the regime.”

According to Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, if the decision stands after appeal, they will serve a three-year prison term for the first charge.

Nasiri and Moradi were granted release on bail totaling 5 billion tomans (approximately 100,000 dollars) in late August of this year.

The Baha’i faith is not recognized as a legitimate religion by Iranian authorities, leading to systematic and longstanding violations of the rights of Baha’is in the country. This includes the denial of their fundamental right to practice their religion, which constitutes a clear breach of both Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Four Baha’i Women Sentenced to Imprisonment

In a recent ruling, Nasim Sabeti, Azita Foroughi, Rouya Ezabadi, and Soheila Ahmadi, all members of the Baha’i faith, were handed down a prison sentence of three years and eight months.

The Mashhad Revolutionary Court, led by Judge Hadi Mansouri, has sentenced each of these Baha’i residents of Mashhad to three years imprisonment for alleged “involvement with groups deemed a threat to national security” and an additional eight months for “disseminating propaganda against the government.”

Should the verdict stand after the appeal process, in accordance with Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, a three-year prison term will be enforced.

Legal proceedings against these individuals commenced in July of this year.

The Baha’i faith is not recognized as a legitimate religion by Iranian authorities, leading to systematic and longstanding violations of the rights of Baha’is in the country. This includes the denial of their fundamental right to practice their religion, which constitutes a clear breach of both Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Baha’i Citizen Nooshin Mesbah Receives Prison Sentence

The Mashhad Revolutionary Court has handed down a sentence of three years and eight months to Baha’i citizen Nooshin Mesbah.

According to the ruling issued by Judge Hadi Mansouri, Mesbah has been sentenced to three years for “membership in groups aiming to endanger national security” and an additional eight months for “spreading propaganda against the regime.”

If the verdict is upheld on appeal, in accordance with Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, the initial three-year prison term will be implemented. Notably, Mesbah had been released on bail totaling 5 billion tomans (approximately 100,000 dollars) in late August, following the conclusion of her interrogation process.

The Baha’i faith is not recognized as a legitimate religion by Iranian authorities, leading to systematic and longstanding violations of the rights of Baha’is in the country. This includes the denial of their fundamental right to practice their religion, which constitutes a clear breach of both Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

 

Baha’i Citizen Sanaz Tafazoli Receives Lengthy Prison Sentence

The Mashhad Revolutionary Court has handed down a lengthy sentence of ten years and nine months to Sanaz Tafazoli, a Baha’i citizen currently held in Vakilabad prison.

Presiding Judge Hadi Mansouri issued the sentence, comprising six years and six months for “forming a group to act against national security,” three years and seven months for “assembly and collusion against national security,” and eight months for “educational/promotional activities against Sharia.”

During the trial, the presentation of “books and works related to the Baha’i faith” and the establishment of “educational groups for Baha’i children” were cited as evidence for the aforementioned charges.

Should this verdict be upheld upon appeal, the first charge of six years and six months will be enforceable as the most severe sentence, in accordance with Article 1434 of the Islamic Penal Code.

On Tuesday, November 22, 2022, intelligence agents apprehended Baha’i citizen Sanaz Tafazoli in Mashhad. A search of her residence resulted in the confiscation of belongings belonging to both her and her son.

After multiple extensions of her detention period, she was incarcerated at Vakilabad Prison on December 29, 2022.

In February, she was granted a ten-billion-toman bail. However, judicial authorities declined her release on bail, returning this heavy bail to her family.

Aged 45, Tafazoli has a history of arrests and imprisonment due to her activism.

According to the HRANA annual report, a significant portion, accounting for 64.63%, of human rights violations against religious minorities were related to the infringement of Baha’i rights.

The denial of the freedom to practice a religion constitutes a breach of Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant asserts that every individual possesses the right to religious freedom, the freedom to convert, and the freedom of expression, both individually and collectively, openly or privately.