Hami Bahadori’s Six-Year Sentence Upheld by Tehran Court of Appeals

The Tehran Court of Appeals has upheld the six-year sentence against Hami Bahadori, a Baha’i citizen currently incarcerated in Evin Prison.

On June 21, Judge Salavati, presiding over branch 15 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, delivered a verdict sentencing Bahadori to five years for “assembly and collusion against national security” and one year for “propaganda against the regime.” Pursuant to Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, the five-year term for the first charge will be enforceable.

In addition to the sentence, Bahadori will face a two-year travel ban, and some of his and his wife’s belongings have been confiscated.

A reliable source close to Bahadori’s family, who spoke to HRANA, revealed that judicial officials initially attempted to link his charges to the nationwide protests in 2022. However, they eventually abandoned those allegations, invoking only his activities as examples of the charges.

Bahadori’s arrest took place on October 22, 2022, by security forces, and he was subsequently detained in Evin Prison. On April 3, 2023, he conveyed his grievances about the unjust treatment of religious minorities within the judicial system through a written letter.

According to HRANA annual report, from the total human rights reports regarding the violation of religious minorities’ rights, 64.63% belonged to the violation of the rights of Baha’is.

The deprivation of the freedom to practice their religion is a breach of Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Baha’i Citizen Hami Bahadori Sentenced to Six Years in Prison

HRANA, Human Rights Activists News Agency-Hami Bahadori, a Baha’i citizen, has been sentenced to six years in prison by the Tehran Revolutionary Court. He is currently being held in Evin Prison.

On June 21, Judge Salavati, presiding over branch 15 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, issued a verdict stating that Bahadori is to serve five years for “assembly and collusion against national security” and one year for “propaganda against the regime.” Additionally, Bahadori has been banned from leaving the country for two years, and some of his and his wife’s belongings have been confiscated.

Should the verdict be upheld on appeal, in accordance with Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, the five-year prison term for the charge of “assembly and collusion” will be enforceable.

According to a reliable source, Bahadori was not provided with prior notice of his trial and was denied the presence of his lawyer. He received this verdict immediately following the court session.

Bahadori was arrested by security forces on October 22, 2022, and subsequently detained in Evin Prison. Recently, he expressed his grievances about the unjust treatment of religious minorities within the judicial system through a written letter.

According to HRANA annual report, from the total human rights reports regarding the violation of religious minorities’ rights, 64.63% belonged to the violation of the rights of Baha’is.

 

 

Baha’i Citizen Hami Bahadori Remains in Detention for Six Months

Baha’i citizen Hami Bahadori continues to be detained for over six months with no signs of release. The Tehran Revolutionary Court has scheduled a second court hearing for June 10, 2023.

According to an informed source, Bahadori was supposed to be released on bail after being indicted on January 3, 2023. However, Judge Salavati has refused to grant him bail, despite numerous pleas from his family. The judicial officials have shown no willingness to consider their requests.

On October 22, 2022, security forces arrested 26-year-old Bahadori and transferred him to Evin prison. The first court session was held on March 5, 2023, at the Tehran Revolutionary Court, where Bahadori faced charges of “assembly and collusion against national security,” “propaganda against the regime,” and “promoting the Baha’i faith.”

Bahadori recently penned a letter expressing his grievances about the unjust treatment of religious minorities within the judicial system.