Baha’is Citizens Jamaloddin Khanjani and Maria Khanjani Arrested and Incarcerated at Evin Prison

On August 13, 2023, Baha’is citizens, Jamaloddin Khanjani and his daughter Maria Khanjani, were apprehended by security forces and subsequently taken to Evin Prison. Jamaloddin Khanjani had formerly served as a manager for a dissolved Baha’i group named “Yaran e Iran” or “Friends of Iran,” an organization that aimed to address the spiritual and social needs of the Baha’i community.

According to a source who communicated with HRANA, the security agents executed a search of their residence before transferring them to Evin Prison. The specific grounds for their detention, as well as the charges against them, remain undisclosed at this time.

It’s worth noting that Jamaloddin Khanjani has previously been subject to legal actions due to his involvement in peaceful activism.

HRANA’s annual report in 2022 has highlighted a concerning trend where about 65% of reported human rights violations against religious minorities are directed toward the Baha’i community.

The Baha’i faith is not recognized as a legitimate religion by Iranian authorities, leading to systematic and longstanding violations of the rights of Baha’is in the country. This includes the denial of their fundamental right to practice their religion, which constitutes a clear breach of both Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Sentences of 20 Years Upheld for Two Baha’i Women

The Tehran Court of Appeal has maintained the original rulings against Baha’i citizens, Mahvash Sabet (Shahriari) and Fariba Kamalabadi, confirming their 20-year prison terms. Initially, both women were sentenced to ten years, along with additional penalties by the Tehran Revolutionary Court on charges of “forming and leading groups to act against national security.”

A source close to Sabet’s family revealed to HRANA that Sabet, aged 70, is battling multiple illnesses that have been aggravated by her prolonged imprisonment. Over the past few months, she has faced several hospitalizations.

These individuals were formerly associated with a dissolved Baha’i group referred to as the “Yaran e Iran” or “Friends of Iran.” Their arrests occurred on July 31, 2022, alongside five other Baha’i individuals, apprehended by security forces across different cities. Moreover, intelligence agents conducted searches at a minimum of 37 Baha’i residences.

Following these apprehensions, the Ministry of Intelligence released a video portraying these individuals as spies, alleging their involvement in infiltrating kindergartens to propagate their beliefs and advocating for the removal of hijab. In response, Simin Fahandej, the spokesperson of the Bahá’í International Community, emphasized: “Iranians of goodwill, who number in their millions, see through these lies. The incident at the kindergarten is the latest in a shameful litany of brazen deception, propaganda, and hate speech, but these efforts do not go unnoticed by the international community and only work against Iran’s interests, showing its true motives of persecuting innocent people only for their beliefs.”

Baha’i Enayatollah Naeimi Receives 15-Year Prison Sentence

Enayatollah Naeimi, a Baha’i citizen, has been sentenced to 15 years in prison, with 10 years to be enforced, by the Isfahan Revolutionary Court. He was also fined and subjected to social deprivation.

The verdict was issued by Judge Morteza Barai, who found Naeimi guilty of “forming groups to act against national security” for which he received 10 years, and “propaganda against the regime,” for which he received five years. The evidence presented for these charges included Naeimi’s involvement with the Baha’i group “Yaran e Iran” or “Friends of Iran,” as well as his association with Baha’i communities in Israel

Under Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, if the verdict is upheld on appeal, Naeimi will serve 10 years in prison for the first charge.
Naeimi was arrested by security forces on September 28, 2022, and his house, workplace, and garden in the Isfahan suburbs were searched. He was later released on bail from Isfahan Prison but now faces a lengthy prison sentence.

According to HRANA annual report, from the total human rights reports regarding the violation of religious minorities’ rights, 64.63% belonged to the violation of the rights of Baha’is.

According to unofficial sources, it is estimated that more than 300,000 Baha’is live in Iran, but the Iranian Constitution recognizes only Islam as the official religion, in addition to Christianity, Judaism, and Zoroastrianism. Baha’i faith is not considered legitimate by the authorities, and the rights of Baha’is in Iran have been systematically violated for years.

The deprivation of the freedom to practice their religion is a breach of Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

 

Enayatollah Naeimi Arrested After Court Hearing

HRANA, Human Rights Activists News Agency- On May 6, 2023, Baha’i citizen Enayatollah Naeimi was arrested and taken to an undisclosed location after a court hearing held by the Isfahan Revolutionary Court. The charges against Naeimi remain unknown.

Naeimi had previously been arrested on September 28, 2023, in Isfahan, during which security forces searched his house, workplace, and garden in the Isfahan suburbs. He was later released temporarily on bail from Isfahan Prison.
Naeimi was a member of the now-disbanded Baha’i group, “Yaran e Iran” or “Friends of Iran,” which catered to the spiritual and social needs of the Baha’i community.

According to HRANA annual report, from the total human rights reports regarding the violation of religious minorities’ rights, 64.63% belonged to the violation of the rights of Baha’is.

According to unofficial sources, it is estimated that more than 300,000 Baha’is live in Iran, but the Iranian Constitution recognizes only Islam as the official religion, in addition to Christianity, Judaism, and Zoroastrianism. Baha’i faith is not considered legitimate by the authorities, and the rights of Baha’is in Iran have been systematically violated for years.

The deprivation of the freedom to practice their religion is a breach of Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

 

 

Two Baha’i Citizens Arrested

HRANA, Human Rights Activists news agency– Two Baha’i citizens, Afif Naeimi (Naimi) and Valliollah Ghadamian, were arrested by security forces on April 29 and May 1, 2023, respectively.

According to a source close to Naimi’s family, on April 29, Naeimi and several of his relatives were gathered in a garden near Karaj when security forces raided the location and arrested Naeimi. He was then taken to Rajai Shahr Prison.

Naeimi is a former member of a now-disbanded Baha’i group known as the “Yaran e Iran” or “Friends of Iran” that addressed the spiritual and social needs of the Baha’i community.

n 2018, Naeimi was released from Ghezel Hesar prison after serving approximately 10 years in prison. However, on July 31, 2022, he was arrested again, and the Karaj Revolutionary Court sentenced him to seven years in prison in a legal case along with twelve other Baha’i co-defendants.

On May 1, 2023, Valliollah Ghadamin was also arrested by security forces and taken to an undisclosed location.

On May 1, 2023, security forces also arrested Valliollah Ghadamian at his residence in Tehran and took him to an undisclosed location. Ghadamian is a member of a Baha’i association that maintains a Baha’i cemetery in Tehran known as Golestan-e-Javid. In recent days, regime officials have refused to issue burial permits to Baha’is in this cemetery.
The reason for these arrests is currently unknown.

According to HRANA annual report, from the total human rights reports regarding the violation of religious minorities’ rights, 64.63% belonged to the violation of the rights of Baha’is. The Baha’i community in Iran has been subjected to various forms of discrimination and persecution for decades. The Iranian government has imposed severe restrictions on Baha’is’ religious practices, education, employment, and civil rights.

 

 

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Now is definitely not the time to stop reading!