Death Sentence Issued in Tehran

Posted on: June 29th, 2021

A defendant in Tehran was sentenced to death by Branch 11 of the First Criminal Court of Tehran Province.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting Rokna news, the man was sentenced on charges of rape and assault.

According to the report, in November 2020, a young woman named Melika went to the police with her husband and filed a rape case against a young man named Taha, who had previously been her neighbor.

After the case was heard in court and consulting, the judges sentenced the defendant to death based on the evidence found in the case.

Citizen Sentenced to Public Execution in Zahedan

Posted on: June 10th, 2021

A prisoner in Zahedan was recently sentenced to execution in public.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting Rokna News, the prisoner was arrested for the murder of his wife and two of his wife’s relatives in Zahedan.

The Public Prosecutor of Sistan and Baluchestan Province said, “A death sentence has been issued for an angry groom who killed a number of his wife’s family members, and if approved by the Supreme Court, he will be executed soon.”

Two Defendants Sentenced to Death in Tehran, Two Others Sentenced to 10 Years

Posted on: May 27th, 2021

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists (HRA), quoting ROKNA news, 30-year-old Sohrab was sentenced to death for raping a teenage girl in Tehran.

Two other young men, Reza and Farhad, were sentenced to 10 years in prison each as they did not try to prevent the assault.

According to ROKNA news, in a separate story, a defendant in Tehran was sentenced to death for murder.

Prisoner Executed in Mashhad on Charge of Rape

Posted on: May 21st, 2021

On the morning of May 19, a prisoner who was previously sentenced to death on a charge of rape was executed in Mashhad Prison.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting the Khorasan newspaper, the 9-year-old child of a foreign national was kidnapped by a young motorcyclist in the outskirts of Mashad in February of last year. The kidnapper abducted the child by threatening him with a knife in front of his mother.

The kidnaper was identified and arrested after detectives found clues that showed he had formed a six-member gang to attack children and teenagers, especially working children.

A special team of detectives with members across operational and intelligence branches managed to arrest all members of the gang. After publishing an unveiled picture of the gang leader in the Khorasan newspaper, several Khorasan residents approached the Iranian Police Criminal Investigation Department, from whom 13 were able to identify the kidnapper and file a lawsuit against him.

Given the importance of the case, Judge Gholam-Ali Sadeghi, Chief Justice of Khorasan Razavi, issued special orders to expedite the investigation. The case was sent to Branch 6 of Criminal Court One to be processed, and the court sentenced the kidnapper to death. The sentence was confirmed by the Supreme Court accordingly.

Ghasem. B. was hanged in Mashhad Central Prison on the morning of May 19.

25-Year-Old Prisoner Executed in Adelabad Prison After Being Tortured and Forced to Confess

Posted on: May 19th, 2021

On May 15, 2021, an inmate in Adelabad Prison in Shiraz was executed on a charge of rape. The prisoner’s identity was confirmed by HRANA as 25-year-old Behzad Ad’l.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Ad’l  was transferred to solitary confinement for execution along with three others sentenced to death on the morning of the 15th.

In June of last year, Ad’l was arrested and sentenced to death and 99 lashes by Branch 1 of the criminal court in Fars Province, presided over by Judge Rajaeinia. The case was appealed and referred to the Supreme Court, and the previous ruling was upheld in less than 18 days.

According to an informed source, the Ad’l’s execution was carried out very hastily, despite at least 2 of his 3 plaintiffs’ agreement on the withdrawal of the sentence.   Start to finish, the  process of issuance, approval, and execution of the sentence took place over the course of less than seven months.

Ad’l did not have a lawyer.  According to the lawsuit in Branch 1 of criminal court in the Fars Province, issued in October 2020, Behzad Ad’l had stated that during interrogation he was tortured and forced to confess to the charges. If he did not cooperate, authorities threatened that his “grandmother (would) be run-over by car.”

At least three other prisoners were transferred to solitary confinement along with Mr. Ad’l for execution. The fate and identities of the other three prisoners are currently unknown.

According to international organizations, considering its population, Iran ranks first in the world in the execution of its citizens. The Statistics and Publication Center of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI) reported that between January 1st and  December 20th of 2020, at least 236 citizens were executed. One of these citizens was executed publicly, and two were juvenile offenders. An additional 95 citizens were sentenced to death.

The report states that more than 72% of executions in Iran are not reported by the government or the judiciary. Human rights organizations call these “secret executions.”

As of this writing, the execution of this prisoner has not been announced by any Iranian media or official sources.

Prisoner Amir Bayati Executed in Shiraz

Posted on: May 19th, 2021

On May 17th, Amir Bayati was executed in Adelabad Prison on a charge of murder under the Qisas (“eye for an eye”) principle of Shariah Law. The execution has not been announced by any Iranian media or official sources at the time of this writing.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting Iran Human Rights (IHR), on May 17th, Amir Bayati was executed after being sentenced to death on a charge of murder.

Amir Bayati was arrested in 2017 and was being held in prison up until his execution on Monday. An informed source repeatedly stated that Bayati committed the murder unintentionally after a fight escalated. Per the report, Bayati lost his temper after the victim shouted obscenities in his direction.  The death sentence falls under the Qisas (loosely translated as “eye for an eye”) principle of Sharia Law.

According to the Statistics and Publication Center of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI), between January 1st and  December 20th of 2020, at least 236 citizens were executed. One of these citizens was executed publicly, and two were juvenile offenders. An additional 95 citizens were sentenced to death.

The report states that more than 72% of executions in Iran are not reported by the government or the judiciary.  Human rights organizations call these “secret executions.”

On May 15, 2021, HRANA reported the execution of a prisoner named Behzad Ad’l, and the transfer of at least three other prisoners for the execution of death sentences in Adelabad Prison in Shiraz.

At the time of writing, the execution of Mr. Bayati has not been reported by domestic media or officials in Iran.

Prisoner Jamal Mohammadi Executed in Ilam Prison

Posted on: May 19th, 2021

On May 16th, Jamal Mohammadi was executed in Ilam Prison on a charge of murder under the Qisas (“eye for an eye”) principle of Shariah Law. The execution has not been announced by any Iranian media or official sources at the time of this writing.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, on May 16th, Jamal Mohammadi  was executed after being sentenced to death by a court on a charge of murder.

About two years ago, during his military service in one of the barracks in Ilam, Mohammadi killed one of his superiors after a verbal conflict. The death sentence falls under the Qisas (loosely translated as “eye for an eye”) principle of Shariah Law.

According to international organizations, considering its population, Iran ranks first in the world in the execution of its citizens. The Statistics and Publication Center of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI) reported that between January 1st and  December 20th of 2020, at least 236 citizens were executed. One of these citizens was executed publicly, and two were juvenile offenders. An additional 95 citizens were sentenced to death.

According to the report, more than 72% of executions in Iran are not reported by the government or the judiciary. Human rights organizations call these “secret executions.”

Mohammadi was executed in the presence of his relatives. At the time of this writing, the execution has not been announced by any Iranian media or official sources.

Mehran Naruyi Executed in Isfahan After IRGC Refuses to Provide Letter of Suspension to Prison Officials

Posted on: May 19th, 2021

On May 16th, Mehran Naruyi was executed on drug-related charges in Dastgerd Prison in Isfahan, despite widespread calls to suspend the process until a fair trial could take place.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting The Baloch Activists Campaign, on May 15th, Naruyi was transferred to solitary confinement in Dastgerd Central Prison before the execution.

Per the report, an informed source said “during the prisoner’s last meeting with his family, prison officials pointed out that they would suspend the sentence if they received a letter from the imam of Isfahan and Revolutionary Guards. However, the IRGC’s Intelligence Organization refused to provide the letter.”

On May 16, 2021, Amnesty International called for an stop to the execution of Naruyi, writing: “The Iranian authorities should grant this prisoner the right to a fair trial without resorting to the death penalty, as well as forcing confessions under torture.”

According to international organizations, considering its population, Iran ranks first in the world in the execution of its citizens. The Statistics and Publication Center of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI) reported that between January 1 and December 20 of 2020, at least 236 citizens were executed. One of these citizens was executed publicly, and two were juvenile offenders. An additional 95 citizens were sentenced to death.

According to the report, more than 72% of executions in Iran are not reported by the government or the judiciary. Human rights organizations call these “secret executions.”

Mehran Naruyi, son of Khodadad, is from Nosratabad city of Zahedan in Sistan and Baluchestan province. As of this writing, this execution has not been announced by any Iranian media or official sources.

Court Hearing Postponed Again for Amirhossein Moradi, Mohammad Rajabi, and Saeed Tamjidi

Posted on: May 18th, 2021

On May 12th, the court hearing for political prisoners Amir Hossein Moradi, Saeed Tamjidi, and Mohammad Rajabi, detained since the national protests of November 2019, was postponed for a second time.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, the prosecutor’s representative, defendants, and lawyers were all present, but the hearing was unable to proceed in the absence of a second judge. The hearing has not yet been rescheduled.

Amir Hossein Moradi, Saeed Tamjidi, and Mohammad Rajabi were previously sentenced to death by the Tehran Revolutionary Court. They were also sentenced to a total of 38 years in prison and 222 lashes.

On Jun 24, 2020, the Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA)  announced that the death sentence of the three political prisoners had been upheld by the Supreme Court. On July 14, 2020, the spokesman of the Judiciary officially announced the confirmation of their  death sentence and said that the sentences had been sent to the prosecutor’s office for execution.

However, according to the lawyers, permission to enter the trial and study the case was given to them on July 15, 2020–weeks after HRANA news agency reported that the death sentence was confirmed in the Supreme Court.

Less than an hour after the official confirmation of the death sentences for Amir Hossein Moradi, Saeed Tamjidi, and Mohammad Rajabi, “#Don’t_execute” became the world’s top trend with hundreds of thousands of tweets. Human Rights Watch, US President Donald Trump, the Writers’ Association of Iran, and others all reacted to this news. The hashtag has now been used more than ten million times.

The following day, UN human rights experts issued a statement and condemned the death sentences. The statement expressed that Amir Hossein Moradi, Saeed Tamjidi, and Mohammad Rajabi were tortured and forced to confess and that these forced confessions were later used against them in their trials. HRANA has previously conducted numerous conversations with informed sources and extensive research to determine what happened to the prisoners in the various processes of activity up to the conviction.

On July 19, 2020, the three defendants’ lawyers issued a joint statement announcing that the case had been referred to a different branch for retrial after the Supreme Court’s acceptance of Article 477.

In mid December of 2020, in the aftermath of the global outcry, the young activists’ request for a retrial was finally accepted by Branch 1 of the Supreme Court and their death sentences were overturned.

The case was then referred to Branch 23 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran, but, due to a change of chief judge of the branch, the first hearing was postponed from March to May 12th.

Now, it has been postponed from May 12th to a date that has yet to be determined.

It is Time that Iran be Held Accountable 

Posted on: November 10th, 2020

HRANA – Last month the world turned its attention to Iran for its seemingly arbitrary transfer of a detained British-Australian academic. Kylie Moore-Gilbert, who was detained in September 2018 and is serving a ten-year sentence, was moved from the notorious Evin Prison to an unspecified location. When Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA) released the report, nearly every major media publication across the globe once again jumped to denounce her detention. Widespread speculation as to Moore-Gilbert’s whereabouts ensued. 

As a human rights professional who focuses on Iran, it was gratifying to see such a swift and appropriate response. However, what about the countless grave and horrific human rights violations that happen every day in this country? Violations that are so numerous that they have become seemingly rote. 

In the week following Moore-Gilbert’s transfer, peaceful protestors outside Iran’s Ministry of Petroleum were violently attacked by Regime Security Forces. In the month of October, at least 130 Iranians were arrested for activities related to their political or ideological beliefs; 83 of which involved the detention of individuals participating in peaceful gatherings related to the ongoing Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict. 

Iran carried out 19 hangings in the month of October alone, sentencing an additional 8 to that same fate throughout the month.

At least 12 members of the Baháʼí religious minority were barred from entering university based solely on their religious beliefs. One man received 80 lashes for converting to Christianity; a thief was sentenced to having his hand amputated.

Iranian courts tried more than 70 political cases which resulted in convictions that totaled 295 years in prison and 2,590 lashes.  A cleric was summoned to court for suggesting there was no problem with women riding a bicycle, an activity for which all women in the country are banned. Two women, sentenced to 33 months each for writing a letter requesting the resignation of the Supreme Leader, were summoned by authorities to begin serving their time. A teacher was sentenced to 45 lashes for drawing a cartoon.

This list is by no means exhaustive. 

These violations are not a secret. HRANA, the very source that initially reported on Moore-Gilbert’s move, reported and continues to report on the numerous human rights violations happening daily in Iran against Iranians, as well as dual and foreign nationals. There remains little to no response.

Detained British-Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert

Why is this? 

I do not have the answer to that question, but I do know the differences these cases bear. The violations listed above are against Iranian citizens; Moore-Gilbert is a foreigner. Her case is, therefore, more appealing to the press it garners a more widespread response – and outcry. 

 

I’m reminded of a quote from Howard Bakerville, a young American who famously became a martyr of Iran’s Constitutional Revolution; he once said, “The only difference between me and these people is my place of birth, and that is not a big difference.” Today I fear there are times, unacceptably so, that this is the difference between life and death, between respect for rights and deprivation thereof. Will the world only shine the light on Iran when a Westerner is tangled in its web? Under international human rights law, States have a duty to respect, protect, and fulfill the rights of those within their jurisdiction. It’s time that Iran be held accountable to its own citizens just as it is to those dual and foreign nationals that find themselves trapped within the confines of a state where deprivation of fundamental human rights continues to be the norm. 

Moore-Gilbert has since been returned to Evin Prison. Her return, much like her move, was documented extensively. The reason for her move remains unknown.

 

Skylar Thompson

Skylar Thompson is a Senior Advocacy Coordinator with Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI). For inquiries please contact email: sk[email protected]