Twelve Individuals Facing Execution for Alleged Security-Political Charges

As of now, a minimum of twelve prisoners in Iran are on the verge of execution, convicted of security-political charges such as “enmity against God (moharebeh), spreading corruption on the Earth, and collaboration with adversary countries.”

HRANA has confirmed their imprisonment in various facilities, including Evin (Tehran), Ghezel Hesar (Karaj), Sheyban Prison (Ahvaz), Dizelabad (Kermanshah), and Zahedan Prisons.
The Tehran Revolutionary Court, specifically Branch 26 and 28 led by Judges Iman Afshari and Mohammad Moghiseh, respectively, is responsible for the majority of these verdicts.

Below is a detailed account of some of these individuals and their current legal status:

Mohsen Mazloum

Mohsen Mazloum

  • Prison: Evin Prison, Ward 209
  • Most Serious Charges: Due to the denial of access to case details for his lawyer, the precise charges leading to the verdict remain undisclosed. However, following the arrest, the Ministry of Intelligence accused him of collaborating with Israel, attempting to sabotage a military facility in Isfahan, and affiliating with the Komala Party (a Kurdistan organization associated with the Communist Party of Iran).
  • Court: Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Iman Afshari
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed in Branch 9 of the Supreme Court. Retrial request rejected.

 

Pezhman Fatehi

Pezhman Fatehi

  • Prison: Evin Prison, Ward 209
  • Most Serious Charges: Due to the denial of access to case details for his lawyer, the precise charges leading to the verdict remain undisclosed. However, following the arrest, the Ministry of Intelligence accused him of collaborating with Israel, attempting to sabotage a military facility in Isfahan, and affiliating with the Komala Party (a Kurdistan organization associated with the Communist Party of Iran).
  • Court: Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Iman Afshari
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed in Branch 9 of the Supreme Court. Retrial request rejected.

 

Vafa Azarbar

Vafa Azarbar

  • Prison: Evin Prison, Ward 209
  • Most Serious Charges: Due to the denial of access to case details for his lawyer, the precise charges leading to the verdict remain undisclosed. However, following the arrest, the Ministry of Intelligence accused him of collaborating with Israel, attempting to sabotage a military facility in Isfahan, and affiliating with the Komala Party (a Kurdistan organization associated with the Communist Party of Iran).
  • Court: Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Iman Afshari
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed in Branch 9 of the Supreme Court. Retrial request rejected.

 

Mohammad (Hazhir) Faramarzi

Hazhir Faramarzi

  • Prison: Evin Prison, Ward 209
  • Most Serious Charges: Due to the denial of access to case details for his lawyer, the precise charges leading to the verdict remain undisclosed. However, following the arrest, the Ministry of Intelligence accused him of collaborating with Israel, attempting to sabotage a military facility in Isfahan, and affiliating with the Komala Party (a Kurdistan organization associated with the Communist Party of Iran).
  • Court: Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Iman Afshari
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed in Branch 9 of the Supreme Court. Retrial request rejected.

 

Description:
On July 23, 2022, Mohsen Mazloum (28), Pezhman (Pejman) Fatehi (28), Vafa Azarbar (29), and Hazhir (Hajir) Faramarzi (29) were apprehended by Iran Police Intelligence (FARAJA) in Sumay-ye Beradust District, Urmia County.

Tasnim, a news agency affiliated with security institutions, reported their arrest, alleging the formation of “a network of Israeli spies.” According to Tasnim, the individuals were in possession of operational and communication equipment, as well as explosive materials. The agency claimed they had entered the country from the Kurdistan region with intentions of conducting unprecedented terrorist operations in strategically sensitive locations.

Approximately 80 days post their arrest, Iran’s state TV broadcasted coerced confessions, accusing them of espionage for foreign intelligence. The confessions stated they had been apprehended in sensitive sites in Isfahan.

In response to what he deemed an unjust and unfair trial, their attorney, Masoud Shams Nejad, asserted, “Since taking on this case as their legal representative, my clients and I have been denied any rights as a lawyer and defendants, rendering my role as their legal representative existing only on paper.”

Anvar Khezri

Anvar Khezri

  • Prison: Ghezel Hesar Prison, Karaj
  • Most Serious Charges: Enmity against God (Moharebeh) through membership in a Salafi group, and involvement in the assassination of Mamusta Abdolrahim Tina.
  • Court: Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Mohammad Moghiseh
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed by the Supreme Court.

 

Kamran Sheikheh

Kamran Sheikheh

  • Prison: Ghezel Hesar Prison, Karaj
  • Most Serious Charges: Similar to Anvar Khezri
  • Court: Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Mohammad Moghiseh
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed by the Supreme Court.

 

 

Farhad Salimi

Farhad Salimi

  • Prison: Ghezel Hesar Prison, Karaj
  • Most Serious Charges: Similar to Anvar Khezri
  • Court: Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Mohammad Moghiseh
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed by the Supreme Court.

 

 

Khosrow Besharat

Khosrow Besharat

  • Prison: Ghezel Hesar Prison, Karaj
  • Most Serious Charges: Similar to Anvar Khezri
  • Court: Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Mohammad Moghiseh
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed by the Supreme Court.

Currently incarcerated in Ghezel Hesar Prison in Karaj, these four Sunni prisoners were part of a group arrested in January-February 2010, accused of aiding in the assassination of Abdolrahim Tina, the Imam of a mosque in Mahabad, which occurred in February 2010.

 

Description:
Originally sentenced to death by Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided over by Mohammad Moghiseh, the verdict was later overturned by the Supreme Court. Subsequently, the case was transferred to Branch 15 of the court, led by Judge Salavati, who reinstated the death sentences for Davoud Abdollahi, Anvar Khezri, Kamran Sheikheh, Farhad Salimi, Khosro Besharat, Ghasem Abasteh, and Ayoub Karimi. On this occasion, the Supreme Court confirmed the death sentences for them and their co-defendants. Among them, Abasteh, Karimi, and Abdollahi have been executed.

Reza Rasaei

Reza Rasaei

  • Prison: Dizelabad, Kermanshah
  • Most Serious Charges: Involvement in the killing of Nader Beyrami, head of IRGC Intelligence, during protests in Sahneh County, Kermanshah province.
  • Court: Branch 1 of the Criminal Court of Kermanshah
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed by the Supreme Court.

 

Description:
Rasaei, 34 years old and known as a Yarsan follower residing in Sahneh County, was arrested on November 24, 2022, by the police and subsequently detained in Sahneh County. After the completion of the interrogation process, he was transferred to Dizel-Abad prison in Kermanshah.

His arrest followed the murder of Nader Beyrami, the head of IRGC Intelligence, in Sahneh County during the 21st annual commemoration ceremony of the death of Seyeed Khalil Alinejad, a leader of the Yaresan community.

Farshid Hassan-Zahi

Farshid Hassan-Zahi

  • Prison: Ward 9 of Zahedan Prison
  • Most Serious Charges: Shooting at the police station vehicle, causing the death of a conscript and a first lieutenant.
  • Court: Branch 1 of the Criminal Court of Zahedan
  • Current Status: Death sentence issued, awaiting confirmation by the Supreme Court.

 

Description:
Arrested for shooting at a police vehicle, Hassan-Zahi, aged 26, currently awaits confirmation of his death sentence.

Mansour Dahmardeh

Mansour Dahmardeh

  • Prison: Ward 9 of Zahedan Prison
  • Most Serious Charges: Spreading Corruption on Earth
  • Court: Branch 2 of the Criminal Court (Shahid Nouri) in Zahedan
  • Current Status: Death sentence issued.

 

Description:
Dahmardeh, a 23-year-old citizen with disabilities, was apprehended during the 2022 nationwide protests in Zahedan and confined to the city’s prison. In January 2023, Branch 2 of the Criminal Court (Shahid Nouri) sentenced him to death on charges of “spreading corruption on earth.” Despite his poor health condition, he has been denied sufficient medical care in Zahedan Prison.

Abbas (Mojahed) Korkori

Mojahed Korkori

  • Prison: Sheiban Prison, Ahvaz
  • Most Serious Charges: Enmity against God (Moharebeh) through using a weapon, spreading corruption on earth, and forming a rebellion group.
  • Current Status: Death sentence confirmed by the Supreme Court

 

Description
Mizan, the judiciary’s news agency, claims that Korkori is responsible for killing 10-year-old Kian Pirfalak during protests in Izeh. However, Pirfalak’s parents have repeatedly denied these accusations and claimed that their son was killed in a shooting by regime forces. Zeinab Molaei-Rad, Kian’s mother, said during his funeral, “On the way back home, the regime agents opened fire on our car.”


The due process involving these twelve death-row convicts reveals a troubling trend of violations against the rights of citizens and prisoners in Iran. Some prisoners, who have managed to communicate from within prison, claim they have endured torture and coerced confessions. In cases where communication was restricted, families have attested to confessions obtained under duress, highlighting the inhumane treatment by judicial and security officials and a blatant disregard for human rights.

Iran’s judicial-security institutions have a long history of constructing legal cases, leveling false accusations, and engaging in torture and mistreatment against political prisoners. These actions constitute a clear violation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other internationally ratified conventions.

Article 10 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights emphasizes that “Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.”

Furthermore, Article 5 of the declaration unequivocally states that “no one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment.”

Concerns Increase about Atena Daemi’s Condition in Rasht Prison After Two Months Incommunicado

After two months in detention, civil activist Atena Daemi is still incommunicado in Rasht’s Lakan Prison.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, her family has not heard from her or received updates about her condition in two weeks, and it seems she is being denied access to phone calls, mounting concern about her situation.

On August 12, in protest against the intentional and frequent interruption of prison phone lines and the poor conditions within the prison, Atena Daemi went on a hunger strike. She broke her hunger strike after five days, after authorities restored her access to a telephone. However, according to an informed source, even at the time, she had been allowed to have only five minutes of phone time with the presence of a prison guard or at the office of the head of the prison.

Atena (Fatemeh) Daemi was sentenced to 14 years in prison on May 15, 2015, by Branch 28 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran, headed by Judge Mohammad Moghiseh, on charges of “assembly and collusion against national security, propaganda against the regime, and offensive statements against the supreme leader”. The verdict was reduced to seven years in the court of appeal, from which five years is enforceable grounded on Article 134 of the Islamic penal code.

She began serving her prison term in December 2016. In 2018, while enduring her sentence in the women’s ward of Evin Prison, she and Golrokh Ebrahimi, another civil activist, faced a new case, for which they were sentenced to an additional three years and seven months in prison by Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran.

The verdict was upheld by the court of appeal. By applying Article 134, two years and one month of this term are enforceable. Additionally, they were condemned to a two-year prohibition from membership in political groups and parties.

Once again, in July 2020, the Revolutionary Court of Tehran opened a new case and sentenced her to two years imprisonment and flogging of 74 lashes. Her request for a retrial was dismissed by the Supreme Court of Iran in March 2021. She and her family have been frequently under pressure by security forces and judiciary officials.

On March 16 of this year, she was transferred from Evin Prison to Lakan Prison in Rasht.

 

Khosro Sadeghi Boroujeni Being Denied Medical Treatment in Evin Prison

Imprisoned writer and journalist Khosro Sadeghi Boroujeni has been denied access to medical treatment by prison authorities despite his poor health condition.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Boroujeni is currently enduring a five-year sentence in Evin Prison in Tehran.

“It is been over a month that he (has been) experiencing a poor health condition,” an informed source told HRANA. “He went several times to prison healthcare (for treatment), but he has not received any adequate treatment despite having body aches, insomnia, dizziness and nausea.”

Khosro Sadeghi Boroujeni was arrested and interrogated after being summoned to the Branch 2 of Evin’s prosecutor’s office on May 8, 2019. He was later temporarily released from Evin Prison on a bail of 300 million tomans.

Boroujeni’s trial was on July 28, 2019. According to the verdict ordered by the Branch 28 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran, which was presided over by judge Mohammad Moghiseh, Boroujeni was sentenced to five years imprisonment on a charge of “assembly and collusion with an intention to commit a crime against the national security”, one year of prison for the charge of “propaganda against the regime”,  and to two years imprisonment on a charge of “insulting the founder of the Islamic Republic”, adding up to a total of eight years imprisonment. This sentence was later reduced to seven years after the charge of “propaganda against the regime” was dropped upon appeal.

Boroujeni has been conducting research on neoliberalism and the political economy of Iran and has written several articles on these subjects in recent years. His essay “Critique of Neoliberalism” was published by H&S Media Publishing Company in the UK. His other book “Globalization and Inequality” was published by Porsesh Publishing Company in 2011.

Khaled Pirzadeh on Day 9 of Hunger Strike in Greater Tehran Prison

Khaled Pirzadeh has been on a hunger strike since May 31 in the Greater Tehran Prison.  This demonstration, Pirzadeh’s second hunger strike of the year,  is in response to prison officials’ denial of visitations and leave in the 25 months since his imprisonment.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Pirzadeh has suffered from low blood pressure, digestive problems, and severe pain in his muscles, joints, and eyes as a result of the hunger strike.

Earlier this year, Pirzadeh went on a hunger strike following the failure of authorities to fulfill their promise to agree to parole. Pirzadeh ended his hunger strike in March after authorities promised that his demands would be met, but they did not follow through.

In May of 2019, the political prisoner was sentenced by Branch 28 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran, headed by Judge Mohammad Moghiseh, to 5 years in prison, and an additional 2 years for “insulting the leadership”.  According to Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, of the 7 total years, 5 can be enforced on Pirzadeh on the charge of “conspiracy and collusion”.

Khaled Pirzadeh underwent foot surgery in August 2020. His legs and spine were severely damaged during detention and required further surgery and physiotherapy. He was also barred from being hospitalized in December 2020 despite having a heart problem.

Prison officials have now asked Pirzadeh to end his strike and promised to address Mr. Pirzadeh’s demands, as before. Whether Pirzadeh accepts their offer given the dubious precedent they have set remains to be seen.