Overview of Political Prisoner Elahe Fooladi’s Legal Situation in Evin Prison

Elahe Fooladi, a political prisoner, is currently serving a five-year sentence in Evin Prison, following a conviction by the Tehran Revolutionary Court on charges of “propaganda against the regime” and “assembly and collusion against national security.”

A source close to the Fooladi family informed HRANA that she has been in the Women’s ward of Evin Prison since December 12, 2023.

Fooladi, approximately 46 years old and originally from Khalkhal, has previously experienced imprisonment. In early 2020, she and her husband were detained by security forces and held in Evin Prison until her conditional release later that summer.

Journalist Ruhollah Nakhaei Begins Serving Two-Year Sentence Despite Pardon

Journalist Ruhollah Nakhaei has initiated his two-year sentence, despite being included in the “general commutation and pardon” directive issued in the winter of 2023, as stated by his lawyer, Parto Borhanpour.

Arrested during the 2022 nationwide protests, Nakhaei was convicted by Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court for “assembly and collusion against national security” (two years) and “propaganda against the regime” (seven months). The verdict, upheld on appeal, is now enforceable for two years, per Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code.

About the 2022 Nationwide Protests

The arrest of Mahsa Amini by Tehran Morality Police for her improper hejab and her suspicious death on September 16 sparked protests sweeping across Iran. During the nationwide protests, about 19600 people, including journalists, artists, lawyers, teachers, students, and civil rights activists, were arrested.

Baha’i Educator Keyvan Rahimian Receives Nine-Year Prison Sentence

Keyvan Rahimian, a Baha’i citizen and lecturer at an online university affiliated with the Baha’i community, has been sentenced to nine years in prison, accompanied by a fine and a six-year deprivation of social rights.

The verdict, issued by Branch 15 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, outlines a five-year sentence for “educational activities and propagating against Sharia Islam” and a four-year sentence for “assembly and collusion against national security.” Alongside the prison term, Rahimian has been prohibited from exercising social rights and ordered to pay a fine.

Should the verdict be upheld on appeal, Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code stipulates that five years of the prison term will be enforced, as it imposes the maximum prison term for one charge from multiple charges.

Rahimian was apprehended by security forces in Tehran on July 18, 2023, and subsequently detained in Evin prison. His detention has been extended for four consecutive months, with Rahimian granted leave from November 25 to 29, 2023, to attend his mother’s funeral.

This is not the first time Rahimian has faced legal repercussions for his activism. In August 2017, he was released from Rajai Shahr Prison after completing a five-year sentence. The current sentence raises concerns about the ongoing suppression of Baha’i individuals engaged in educational and community activities.

Political Prisoner Majid Tavakoli Faces Upheld Six-Year Sentence Following Retrial

Branch 54 of the Court of Appeal in Tehran has affirmed a six-year sentence for political prisoner Majid Tavakoli.

A source close to his family confirmed to HRANA that Tavakoli was sentenced to six years in prison, along with internet and social media usage restrictions for two years, a two-year ban from residing in Tehran, and a travel ban for two years.

Tavakoli received notification of this verdict on January 29.

Previously, the Supreme Court accepted Tavakoli’s request for a retrial, transferring the case to another court branch. Notably, Tavakoli, a student activist and former political detainee, was arrested by security forces in Tehran on September 23, 2022, during the Mahsa Amini Protests. He was released on bail on December 19, 2022.

Subsequently, Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court imposed a six-year sentence, which was upheld on appeal. On October 7, 2023, Tavakoli commenced serving his sentence in Evin Prison.

Tavakoli’s history of arrests and convictions is rooted in his activism.

Woman Sentenced to 11 Months in Prison After Confrontation with Religious Vigilante Over Dog Walk

The Tehran Revolutionary Court has handed down an eleven-month prison term to Negin Chaparian for an altercation with a religious vigilante who harassed her while walking her dog.

According to the recent verdict from Branch 29 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Chaparian has been convicted of “spreading propaganda against the regime, provoking impurity and indecency, and outraging public decency.”

In August 2023, 34-year-old Chaparian, a Tehran resident, engaged in a dispute with a religious vigilante in a park who objected to her walking a dog, deeming it inappropriate by Islamic standards. Subsequently, she was arrested after sharing photos of the incident on social media. Chaparian spent three days in detention and was later released on bail.

This incident highlights a concerning violation of citizens’ privacy rights and freedom, as the Iranian regime encourages individuals to enforce the Islamic code in public as a religious duty.

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Eleven Individuals Sentenced to a Total of 95 Years for Political Charges

Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court has issued extensive sentences totaling 95 years for 11 defendants on political charges. In addition to imprisonment, the individuals have also been fined and subjected to flogging and other supplementary penalties.

Under the direction of Judge Iman Afshari, the court delivered the following verdicts:

Vahid Gol-Sorkh: Five years for Blasphemy, five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime,” five years for “inciting people to violence”, totaling 16 years with five years enforceable.

Kazem Alineajd Baralu: Five years for Blasphemy, five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime,” totaling 11 years with five years enforceable.

Arsham (Mahmood) Rezaie: Five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime,” five years for “inciting people to violence”, two years for “illegal acquisition of property,” two years and paying a fine for “dissemination of false information,” totaling 15 years with five years enforceable.

Meysam Gholami: Five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime, totaling six years with five years enforceable.

Vahid Ghadirzadeh: Five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime, totaling six years with five years enforceable.

Ali-Asghar Hassani-Rad: Five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime, and two years for “illegal acquisition of property,” totaling eight years with five years enforceable. Additionally, he has received 11 lashes for “holding drug,” and paying a fine.

Saman Rezaie: Four years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime,” with four years enforceable.

Fatemeh Haghparast Sahi: eight months for “propaganda against the regime,” paying a fine for “presence in public without Hijab.”

Payam Bastani Parizi: Five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime,” ten years for “forming group to act against national security,” with ten years enforceable.

Mohammad-Reza Kamrani-Nejad: Five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime,” detention period included. Five years will be enforceable to him.

Hojatollah Rafei: Five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” and one year for “propaganda against the regime,” detention period included. Five years will be enforceable to him.

Reports from the Department of Statistics and Publication of HRA in 2023 indicate a total of 193 cases in which Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided over by Judge Iman Afshari, has been involved in issuing verdicts that infringe upon the human rights of defendants.

Azad Peikarifar Receives Prison Sentence and Exile

Political defendant Azad Peikarifar has been sentenced by the Tehran Revolutionary Court to six years in prison and two years of exile.

Presiding over Branch 26, Judge Iman Afshari issued the verdict, attributing five years to “assembly and collusion to commit crime” and one year for “propaganda against the regime.” Additionally, Peikarifar was handed a two-year prison sentence.

If the verdict stands upon appeal, as outlined in Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, the initial five-year prison term for the first count will be enforceable.

Peikarifar, arrested by security forces on November 13, 2023, is currently held in Evin Prison.

 

Mahnaz Tarah Sentenced to Four Years and Four Months in Prison

The Tehran Revolutionary Court has issued a four-year, four-month prison sentence to Mahnaz Tarah on political charges.

Iman Afshari, presiding over Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court, delivered a three-year and eight-month sentence for “assembly and collusion to act against national security” and an additional eight months for “propaganda against the regime.”

Pending appeal, if the verdict is upheld, the enforceable prison term will be three years and eight months, under Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code.

Security forces arrested Tarah on November 13, 2023, on a Tehran street. Following an 11-day detention in the Ministry of Intelligence’s Ward 209 of Evin Prison, she was subsequently transferred to the Public Ward of the same prison.

Tarah has a history of previous encounters with security and judicial confrontations.

Reports from the Department of Statistics and Publication of HRA in 2023 indicate a total of 193 cases in which Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided over by Judge Iman Afshari, has been involved in issuing verdicts that infringe upon the human rights of defendants.

 

Mohsen Haji-Mohammadi Sentenced to Four Years on Political Charges

The Tehran Revolutionary Court has handed down a four-year prison sentence to Mohsen Haji-Mohammadi, while co-defendant Pouria Shokoohi-Rad has been acquitted of the charges.

Presiding over Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Judge Iman Afshari found Haji-Mohammadi guilty of the political charge of “assembly and collusion against national security” during the court session held on December 4 of this year.

Both defendants were apprehended separately in Tehran in September 2023. After seven days of detention in solitary confinement by the Public Security Police, they were subsequently transferred to Evin Prison.

Notably, Haji-Mohammadi has a history of arrests and previous incarcerations due to his activism.

Reports from the Department of Statistics and Publication of HRA indicate a total of 193 cases in which Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court has been involved in issuing verdicts that infringe upon the human rights of defendants.

Trial Commences for Swedish National Johan Floderus

On December 10, 2023, Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court initiated proceedings in the trial of Johan Floderus, a Swedish citizen facing charges of “spreading corruption on earth” and “espionage,” as reported by Mizan, Iran’s judiciary news agency.

Presided over by Judge Iman Afshari, the court session saw Floderus, accompanied by his legal representative, contesting the array of charges leveled against him, which include “spreading corruption on earth” and “undermining national security by collaborating with Israel to gather intelligence.” Throughout the proceedings, the prosecutor asserted that Floderus had allegedly “established a network in Iran in conjunction with the Swedish Intelligence service, engaged in activism aimed at overthrowing the regime, disguised fund transfers to Iran as part of a project, traveled to Israel, and collaborated with Israeli Intelligence within the European Union.”

Floderus was formally indicted in November of the current year.

In April 2022, Floderus visited Iran. As he was departing Iran on April 16, 2022, he was detained by the Ministry of Intelligence at the airport on charges of espionage.

In July, the Ministry of Intelligence issued a statement asserting that Floderus had made multiple trips to Iran. During his last visit, he was allegedly on a mission to uncover the identity of another spy who had been apprehended in Iran. Intelligence agents monitored his communications and, after accumulating evidence, arrested him under a warrant issued by the judiciary.

It is worth noting that on May 6, 2022, the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs confirmed his detention in Iran. The Swedish daily newspaper Aftonbladet described his arrest as a retaliatory move by Iran’s regime in response to the trial of Hamid Nouri, a prominent figure involved in the 1988 executions of Iranian political prisoners. Nouri had been arrested in November 2019 in Sweden and subsequently convicted of crimes against humanity.