Sentences of Four Workers’ Rights Advocates Reduced After Retrial

Four workers’ rights activists, Keyvan Mohtadi, Anisha Asadollahi, Hassan Saeedi, and Reza Shahabi, have had their prison sentences reduced to three years and seven months following a retrial, reports Shargh Newspaper.

Originally sentenced to six years, the activists appealed for a retrial, which was granted and subsequently heard by a different court branch, leading to the reduction, their attorney Hossein Taj confirmed.

On May 9, 2022, security forces arrested Mohtadi and Asadollahi at their home and detained them at Ward 209 of Evin Prison in Tehran. Mohtadi was later transferred to Ward 4. In January 2023, Tehran’s Revolutionary Court initially sentenced Mohtadi to five years for “assembly and collusion against national security” and an additional year for “propaganda against the regime.” Both verdicts were affirmed upon appeal.

Asadollahi faced similar charges, receiving five years for “assembly and collusion against national security” and eight months for “propaganda against the regime.” Her sentences were also upheld by Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided over by Judge Iman Afshari. The couple had faced arrests and convictions previously for their civil rights activities.

Hassan Saeedi, affiliated with the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran Bus Company, was arrested on May 18, 2022. He was sentenced to six years for “propaganda against the regime” and “assembly and collusion to undermine national security,” along with facing a travel ban and restrictions on political activities and social media usage. Additionally, he was prohibited from residing in Tehran Province and its neighboring provinces for two years.

Reza Shahabi, a board member of the same syndicate, received a six-year sentence for analogous charges, along with similar bans and restrictions. His verdict was upheld in January 2023. Shahabi has a history of previous arrests and convictions due to his activism.

A Statistical Analysis of the Iranian Workers’ Situation in the Last Year

In observance of International Workers’ Day, this report by Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRA) provides statistics on the condition of Iranian workers over the past year, highlighting their ongoing struggle with violations of labor rights and unionization, low wages, wage arrears, and workplace safety concerns.

Workplace Accidents

According to the Statistics and Publication Center of HRA, in the past twelve months (from May 1, 2023, to April 27, 2024), at least 9,879 workers have been killed or injured in workplace accidents based on reports made by either state media or workers’ rights organizations.

According to HRA’s Statistics and Publication Center, over the past twelve months (from May 1, 2023, to April 27, 2024), at least 9,879 workers have been killed or injured in workplace accidents as reported by either state media or workers’ rights organizations.

During this period, at least 1,680 workers died in work-related accidents, with 1,514 deaths reported by ten official sources and the remaining 166 deaths reported by independent organizations. These statistics are likely underestimations due to the lack of transparency from relevant institutions and their failure to release information to the public.

Additionally, 3,066 workers were injured at work, with 2,333 cases mentioned in six official reports or statements made by officials at the national or provincial level. Civil and labor rights associations reported the remaining 733 cases.

Here is a breakdown of the types of accidents:

   . 23.87% were due to falls from height
   . 19.71% were caused by fires
   . 9.58% were related to construction accidents
   . 7.59% involved impacts from hard objects
   . 7.59% occurred in factories
   . 6.69% were linked to well accidents
   . 6.51% involved electrocutions
   . 4.70% were related to vehicle accidents
   . 4.16% occurred in mines
   . 3.80% were due to gas poisoning
   . 2.53% happened in petrochemical plants and refineries
   . 1.08% were due to drownings
   . 0.90% were related to agricultural accidents
   . 0.90% were caused by poisonings
   . 0.18% were due to heat strokes
   . 0.18% were caused by frostbites

Wage Arrears (Withheld wages) 

According to statistics from HRA’s Statistics and Publication Center, at least 84,226 workers are owed wage arrears totaling more than 1,052 combined monthly payments.

As Figure below indicates, public sector companies and organizations account for 54% of these wage arrears. The private sector is responsible for 31%, while the energy sector accounts for 4%. The type of organizations responsible for the remaining 11% of wage arrears is unknown.

Unfortunately, many official reports do not specify the number of workers waiting for wage arrears, making it difficult to provide an accurate figure.

Peaceful Assembly and Association

During the reporting period, media and civil society organizations have documented 428 workers’ protests and 1,448 trade union protests, marking increases of 100.5% and 90% respectively compared to the previous year. A significant portion of labor protests likely goes unreported.

Major labor events in the country over the past year include the workers’ protests of Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Company and Railway Services & Technical Construction Engineering, Iran National Steel Industrial Group, Aghajari Oil and Gas Exploitation Company, teachers and educators, civil servant pensioners and the pensioners from the Social Security Organization, national telecommunication company.

Over the past 12 months, numerous cities across the country witnessed a variety of labor protests with demands ranging from addressing insurance issues to resolving wage arrears, which sometimes accumulate up to 30 months. A total of 97 labor strikes and 37 union strikes were reported, representing a decrease of 14% and 90.6% respectively.

Iranian workers’ efforts to organize and persist in their demands have been remarkable. However, the suppression of unionization attempts, the arrest and imprisonment of labor activists, and the denial of workers’ rights to protest have led to some labor protests being sporadic and disorganized.

In Iran, traditional labor unions do not exist. Workers’ efforts to form independent unions are suppressed through security crackdowns and politically motivated allegations against workers’ rights activists, as seen in the cases of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company, Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Syndicate, the Coordination Council of Iranian Teachers’ Trade Associations, and the Independent Iranian Workers Union (IIWU).

Many workers have been summoned, arrested, or convicted for peaceful activities such as protesting low wages. In the past 12 months, at least 51 workers and workers’ rights activists have been arrested. The most notable cases include the arrest of 32 protesting workers in two mines at the Aq-Darreh gold mines and several contractors working at the South Pars/North Dome gas-condensate field located in Bushehr.

Currently imprisoned workers’ rights activists include Reza Shahabi, Hassan Saeedi, Nahid Khodajoo, Othman Esmaeili, Anisha Asadollahi, Keyvan Mohtadi, Nasrin Javadi, Yadi Bahari, Mehran Raoof, and union activists Rasoul Bodaghi, Mohammad Sadeghi, and Asghar Amirzadegan.

Additionally, 26 workers and workers’ rights activists have been sentenced to a total of 460 months in prison, 86 months of suspended sentences, 1,258 lashes, and fines totaling 42.5 million tomans.

In the reporting period, 10 workers committed suicide, including one self-immolation. Additionally, 48 workers faced arraignment, 5 verdicts were enforced, and 2 activists’ residences were searched. Ten workers were summoned by security or judicial institutions. In the same period, 47 factories were closed, 2,514 workers were laid off, 3,188 workers lost their jobs involuntarily, and 2,272,461 workers lacked any labor insurance scheme. Furthermore, 3,996 workers were suspended from work due to factory closures or other reasons for which the employer was responsible.

Moreover, 26 trade union activists were arrested, and 66 were sentenced to a total of 1,495 months in prison, 18 months of suspended sentences, 72 lashes, 24 months of exile, and fines totaling 185,700 tomans. Additionally, 57 trade union activists were summoned by security or judicial authorities, 130 were laid off, and 13 were forced into retirement and 11 were banned from leaving the country. Wage arrears of 335 months affected 13,600 workers. Security forces searched two activists’ residences, 9 verdicts were enforced, and 14 suicides were reported. Public Security Police or other authorities closed 2,049 businesses.

Over the past 12 months, retired and working teachers and educators from dozens of cities across the country have continued their protests, strikes, and rallies. They have staged numerous actions to demand improvements to their working conditions. The report recorded 44 protest gatherings and 4 labor strikes by teachers. As a result of these protests, 21 people were arrested, 49 were summoned, and 36 were convicted. Additionally, 10,600 people faced at least 48 months of wage arrears. Sixty-one teachers were laid off or banned from teaching, and 9 were forced into early retirement. Furthermore, 64 teachers and teachers’ union activists were sentenced to a total of 1,495 months in prison, 18 months of suspended sentences, 24 cases of social deprivations, 72 lashes, and fines totaling 125.7 million tomans.

The Economic Situation

Referring to the disparity between workers’ wages and inflation, as well as the devaluation of the national currency, Saeed Mostafa-Neajd, Executive Secretary of Worker House (Khaneh Kargar) in East Azerbaijan Province, stated that “If workers’ wages are not reconsidered, they will turn to jobs like motorcycle delivery and garbage collecting instead of remaining in manufacturing jobs. Their concerns have shifted from housing and cars to basic sustenance, worrying about having enough to eat for tomorrow.

In response to the “10% reduction in workers’ salaries due to closing on Thursdays,” Mohammad Chakoshian, Deputy Minister of Cooperatives, Labour, and Social Welfare, stated, “This plan cannot be implemented as it goes against labor law to reduce wages. If such a violation occurs, it must be addressed and prevented.”

The ILNA news agency reported that, given the current economic situation in the country, workers earning just $3 per day cannot afford a simple meal. Despite a 35% increase in minimum wages, the purchasing power of workers’ households has been greatly diminished by high inflation and the devaluation of the currency. To buy a basic car like the Pride, a worker would need to save 19 months’ worth of wages without spending any money.

Davoud Mirzaie, Executive Secretary of Worker House (Khaneh Kargar) in Saveh blamed secret collusion between members of parliament and the government for the difficult living conditions faced by the workers and pensioners. He stated that instead of fulfilling their empty promises, they imposed different policies on the representatives of workers in the Supreme Labor Council.

“The government and its economic team, along with members of parliament, have made it more difficult to retire by raising the retirement age and extending the required work record for retirement. They have also effectively abolished the law regarding difficult and hazardous occupations. The Ministry of Cooperatives, Labour, and Social Welfare has made decisions worse than in previous years, suppressing labor rights once again, which will worsen the living conditions of millions of retired workers,” Mirzaie added.

Criticizing the reduction in real wages, a board member of Worker House in Qom Province stated that this decrease will further impoverish workers. The minimum wages were set without accounting for real inflation. “The worker’s representative was not treated fairly in Supreme Labor Council meetings, and the government unilaterally made decisions regarding the minimum wage. The worker community has been trapped in a dire situation due to the wrong and unwise decisions of some officials.”

According to Nader Moradi, a workers’ rights advocate, the monthly cost of living for a worker’s household is at least 30 million tomans. With their current wages, workers can barely survive, and their monthly income may only cover expenses for one week. Workers cannot afford the costs of adequate food, medical expenses, and education. In an interview with ILNA, Moradi warned about the Supreme Labor Council’s decision: “This level of disregard for the law is unprecedented. If wages this year do not keep pace with inflation, the subsistence crisis will worsen, leaving no way out.”

Referring to the challenging situation faced by female workers in Iran, Binazir Jalahi, a former official from the Ministry of Cooperatives, Labour, and Social Welfare, confirmed that labor laws for women are largely not enforced. She also highlighted gender wage discrimination, noting that women earn less than men for the same work and do not receive child and guardian allowances.

Regarding the cost of living, the latest report from the Statistical Center of Iran indicates that the average cost of housing in Tehran is 80 million tomans per square meter. This amount, as estimated by the Entekhab website, is equivalent to a full-time worker’s entire annual income.

Tasnim News Agency reported that a directive from the Ministry of Education, which prohibits teachers from retiring during the school year and has been affirmed by the court of Administrative Justice, faced objections from some teachers. In the teachers’ appeal, they argued that the directive infringes on their rights since the retirement dates of many teachers fall within the school year. Teachers have traditionally retired at any semester, and they further objected that the directive limiting retirement after the start of the school year violates the law and the ministry’s justifications of potential disruptions in students’ education stem from its own mismanagement.

Regarding this year’s minimum wages, an official from the Social Security Retired Center of Tehran stated, “Since the workers’ representatives did not sign the resolution and the minimum wage for this year was set against legal criteria and without workers’ agreement, workers have the right to file a complaint.” The official added, “A 22% increase in pensions is insufficient and will push many pensioners from the Social Security Organization into absolute poverty. Article 96 of the Social Security law clearly states that pensions should increase in line with the cost of living. Therefore, the Supreme Labor Council’s resolution should not be followed for increasing pensions.”


Prohibition of child labor and the provision of free education for children, the establishment of the highest level of safety standards in the workplace, and the elimination of discriminatory laws for women and migrant workers are other demands of the working community.

Despite being a part of the cheapest labor force in the country, women’s labor situation is worse than men, with fewer benefits, lower wages, and a lesser degree of legal protection. Even worse, women have less bargaining power in the workplace.

Employers in manufacturing industries are less willing to recruit married women, and in some cases, single women’s recruitment is conditioned on not getting married or pregnant. Female workers’ situation in small workshops is far worse. Women comprise half of the workers occupied at bricklaying, a laborious and onerous work.

The ongoing privatization of government-owned industrial sectors has further degraded work conditions, job security, and benefits, leading to an increase in workers’ protests and strikes.

As Iranian workers celebrate International Workers’ Day there is little prospect of improvement through domestic reform or remedy. Nonetheless, the State must uphold its international human rights obligations under both the ICCPR and the ICESCR, ensuring that workers and labor rights activists are free to peacefully assemble and associate without fear of reprisal.


For further inquiries please contact Skylar Thompson, Senior Advocacy Coordinator Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRA) at [email protected]

A Statistical Analysis of the Iranian Workers’ Situation in the Last Year

As International Workers’ Day approaches, Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRA) shed light on the dire situation of Iranian workers over the past year. The HRA provides statistics on workers’ most pressing issues, including the denial of labor rights and unionization, low wages, wage arrears, and workplace safety issues.

Workplace Accidents

Iran ranks 102nd in the world in terms of occupational safety. According to the Statistics and Publication Center of HRA, in the past twelve months (from May 1, 2022, to April 27, 2023), at least 3576 workers have been killed or injured based on 2314 reports of work accidents made by either state media or workers’ rights organizations.

During this period, 3,066 workers were injured at work, with 2,333 cases mentioned in six official reports or comments made by officials at the national or provincial level. Civil and labor rights associations reported the remaining 733 cases.

At least 510 workers lost their lives in work-related accidents, with 250 deaths reported by eight official sources and the remaining 260 deaths reported by independent organizations. However, it is important to note that these statistics are likely an underestimation due to the lack of transparency of relevant institutions and their failure to disseminate information to the public.

Inconsistencies in official statements also suggest that official figures should be viewed with skepticism. For example, the Iranian Legal Medicine Organization stated that “during the last 10 years (2008-2018), 15,997 workers lost their lives in work accidents, of which 230 were women.” Considering these figures, the average number of work-related fatal casualties should be significantly higher than the officially-announced death toll of 250.

Falling from tall heights is the leading cause of death in work-related incidents, accounting for 41.5% of workplace deaths over the past ten years, according to official reports.

Occupational Accident Classification Chart

In the past year, based on data gathered by HRA’s Statistics and Publication Center, workplace accidents, illustrated by Figure 1, occurred in the following sectors: construction (20%), fires (19%), wells (9%), falling from tall heights (9%), being struck by hard objects (8%), factories (8%), motor vehicles (8%), electrocutions (6%), mines (6%), suffocation (5%), and petrochemical, oil, and gas refineries (2%).

Wage Arrears (Withheld wages) 

According to statistics compiled by HRA’s Statistics and Publication Center, at least 14,232 workers are owed wage arrears amounting to more than 712 combined monthly payments.

the distribution of wage arrears
As Figure 2 shows, public sector companies and organizations are responsible for 80% of these wage arrears. This figure is 14% for the private sector and 4% for the energy sector. The nature of the organizations responsible for 2% of these wage arrears remains unknown.
Unfortunately, many official reports fail to provide the number of workers awaiting wage arrears, which prevents the reporting of an accurate number.

Peaceful Assembly and Association

During the reporting period, a total of 1,616 reports on workers’ protest rallies and strikes were registered, indicating a decrease compared to previous years. This reduction can be partly attributed to the outbreak of nationwide protests sweeping across the country since September 17, 2022.

Media and civil society organizations have reported 225 workers’ protests and 772 trade union protests, which marks a 55% and 61% decrease, respectively, compared to the previous year.

Major labor events in the country over the past year include the workers’ protests of Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Company and Karun Agro-industry Company, farmers, teachers and educators, the pensioners from the Social Security Organization.

Over the past 12 months, numerous cities across the country witnessed a wide range of labour protests with various demands such as addressing insurance issues and wage arrears, the latter sometimes accumulating up to 30 months. In total, 113 labour strikes and 395 union strikes have been reported, showing a decrease of 70% and 50% respectively.

However, solidarity among workers to pursue their demands has been unprecedented. Suppression of any attempt toward unionization and forming independent labor organizations, the arrest and imprisonment of labor activists, and the denial of workers’ rights to protest are major reasons for making some workers’ protests sporadic and disorganized.

In Iran, there are no labor unions in the conventional sense. Workers’ efforts to form an independent workers union are suppressed by security and politically-tainted allegations against workers’ rights activists. This can be seen in the cases of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company, Haft Tappeh SugarCane Syndicate, the Coordination Council of Iranian Teachers’ Trade Associations, and the Independent Iranian Workers Union (IIWU).

Many workers have been summoned, arrested or convicted for peaceful activities such as protests against low wages, signing a petition in support of labour unions, posting photos of workers’ demonstrations on the internet or even receiving an invitation letter to attend world trade union meetings.

At least 49 workers and workers’ rights activists have been arrested in the past 12 months. The top three cases are the arrest of 16 protesting workers at Sungun copper mine in Varzeghan, 12 striking workers of the Tehran bus workers’ syndicate, and 7 protesting workers of Karun Cement Factory.

Many workers have been summoned, arrested or convicted for peaceful activities such as protests against low wages, signing a petition in support of labor unions, posting photos of workers’ demonstrations on the internet or even receiving an invitation letter to attend world trade union meetings. The most well-known imprisoned workers’ rights activists include Reza Shahabi, Keyvan Mohtadi, Nasrin Javadi, Arash Johari, Yadi Bahari, Mehran Raoof along with the trade union activists Mohammad Habibi, Jafar Ebrahimi, Rasoul Bodaghi, Esmail Abdi, Latif Roozikhah, and Mohammad-Reza Ramezanzadeh.

Additionally, 42 workers and workers’ rights activists have been sentenced to a combined total of 162 months imprisonment, 129 months of suspended imprisonment, a combined total of 510 lashes and paying a total fine of 51 million Tomans. In the reporting period, 6 workers committed self-immolation and 24 workers committed suicide. 21 were summoned by security or judicial institutions. 1,838 workers were subjected to layoffs; 4,228 involuntarily lost their jobs; 1,203,709 workers remain deprived of any labour insurance scheme; 2,783 workers were suspended from work due to factory closure or other reasons for which the employer is liable.

Moreover, 162 trade union activists were arrested. 34 trade union activists were sentenced to a combined total of 863 months imprisonment. 65 individuals were summoned by security or judicial authorities and 1,435 businesses were closed by Public Security Police or other authorities.

During the past 12 months, continuing their protests in the year before, retired and working teachers and educators from dozens of cities across the country staged numerous protests, strikes, and rallies to ask for their demands. 151 of their protest gatherings and 20 labour strikes have been recorded. Following these protests, 148 teachers were arrested, 55 were summoned, 38 were convicted. 11 protesting teachers were subjected to violence by police and security forces. 34 teachers and teachers union activists were sentenced to a combined total of 863 months in prison and a combined total fine of 40 million Tomans.

The Economic Situation

Hasan Habibi, a board member of the Supreme Center of Islamic Labor Councils informed the public about a sweeping wave of worker complaints regarding insufficient annual salaries. Workers are requesting repeal and re-adjustment with inflation. Habibi stated, “The annual salary increase enacted under the pressure of the government representatives at the Supreme Labor Council meeting is at variance with labor code. Although officially announced inflation was at least 50%, wages were only raised by 27% this year.”

Habibi also added, “It remains to be seen whether the court of Administrative Justice will compromise with the employers or rule in favor of workers. In the case of workplace safety and the repeal of petition 179, the complaints have gone nowhere. We hope their course of action will change this time.”

Nasrollah Daryabeigi, the Executive Secretary of the Workers’ House, which is the de facto national trade union center in Iran, pointed out that employers do not pay worker’s insurance in a timely manner, and 90% of workers currently have partial employment contracts.

The Executive Secretary of the Zanjan Workers’ House also asserted that the labor code, particularly Article 41, has been violated in the determination of annual wage increases. “While the government itself has set the poverty line at a monthly income of 14 million Tomans, it recognizes the minimum wage as half of this line,” he argues.

Faramarz Tofighi, the head of the Wage Committee at the Supreme Center of Islamic Labor Councils, pointed out that the delay in starting the work of this committee negatively affects workers’ living conditions. “The subsistence crisis has come to a head, and any increase in wages below one hundred percent never catches up with the livelihood expenses. To have a normal life, workers should earn two to three times more.”

Bahram Hasani-Nejad, a workers’ rights activist and the former head of the Chadormalu Mining Workers’ Association, clarifies that assuming the minimum standards for livelihood and basic needs, a household needs to earn 17 to 18 million monthly.

As many experts and workers’ rights activists have pointed out, the minimum wage, as announced by the Supreme Labor Council, falls lower than the actual inflation rate and consumption expenditure of households. This explains the increase in workers’ protests and their disempowerment to raise their voices.


Prohibition of child labor and the provision of free education for children, the establishment of the highest level of safety standards in the workplace, and the elimination of discriminatory laws for women and migrant workers are other demands of the working community.

Despite being a part of the cheapest labor force in the country, women’s labor situation is worse than men, with fewer benefits, lower wages, and a lesser degree of legal protection. Even worse, women have less bargaining power in the workplace.

Employers in manufacturing industries are less willing to recruit married women, and in some cases, single women’s recruitment is conditioned on not getting married or pregnant. Female workers’ situation in small workshops is far worse. Women comprise half of the workers occupied at bricklaying, a laborious and onerous work.

The ongoing privatization of government-owned industrial sectors has further degraded work conditions, job security, and benefits, leading to an increase in workers’ protests and strikes.

As Iranian workers celebrate International Workers’ Day there is little prospect of improvement through domestic reform or remedy. Nonetheless, the State must uphold its international human rights obligations under both the ICCPR and the ICESCR, ensuring that workers and labor rights activists are free to peacefully assemble and associate without fear of reprisal.


For further inquiries please contact Skylar Thompson, Senior Advocacy Coordinator Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRA) at [email protected]

Trade Union Activist Reza Shahabi still in Detention

Trade Union Activist Reza Shahabi had been detained in Ward 209 of Evin Prison for the past 100 days. Shahabi is a board member of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Trade Union Activist Reza Shahabi is still in detention for the past 105 days, awaiting processing.

An informed source told HRANA that Shahabi suffers from several illnesses, but the prison officials have not provided proper medical care.

On May 12, 2022, security forces arrested Shahabi at his house in Tehran and transferred him to Evin Prison.

On June 13, Shahabi started his hunger strike in protest against his prolonged detention, which he has ended.

Trade Union Activist Reza Shahabi Goes on Hunger Strike in Evin Prison

On Monday, June 13, 2022, Reza Shahabi, trade union activist and a board member of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company started his hunger strike in protest against his prolonged detention. Shahabi who suffers from poor health has been detained in Ward 209 of Evin Prison for over 30 days.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, on Monday, June 13, 2022, trade union activist Reza Shahabi went on hunger strike to protest against his detention.

Last Sunday, Shahabi’s detention was extended for one month.

On Thursday, May 12, 2022, security forces arrested Reza Shahabi at his house in Tehran.

In previous years, Reza Shahabi faced other arrests and convictions for his civil activities.

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Workers’ Rights Activist Reza Shahabi Arrested  in Tehran

On Thursday, May 12, 2022, RezaShahabi, workers’ rights activist and a member of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company was arrested at his house.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company, security forces arrested Reza Shahabi at his house in Tehran.

The reason for the arrest, charges and his whereabouts are still unknown. Reza Shahabi has been arrested on previous occasions for his civil activities.

Four Months Report of Workers’ Conditions in Iran

Human Rights Activist News Agency (HRANA) – The following is a four months overview of workers’ rights violations in Iran between February and May 2019, per information compiled and verified by the Statistics, Publications, and Achievements Division of Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI).

Domestic restrictions in Iran on independent human rights reporting make it difficult to capture the full extent of these issues on the ground. The following overview draws on the work of HRANA reporters, as well as a network of independent and verifiable sources, including other human rights associations operating outside of Iran’s borders.

 

Monthly Report of Workers in Iran in February 2019

Several workers were arrested and faced trial in February. Also, the purchasing power of workers was steadily decreased in this month. Abdolreza Azizi, a member of the Social Affairs Committee of the Iranian Parliament stated that workers have lost 70 percent of their purchasing power. Tens of workers died or were injured because of the lack of work safety and hundreds of them were laid off. Another ongoing problem for workers was having unpaid wages this month.

The unpaid wages were issues of concern for many of Iranian workers, for instance, workers of Borujerd Saman Tile, nurses of Azadi Hospital in Tehran, Abejdan (in Andika county) municipality workers, workers of Rasht, Sedeh, Ilam, Shadegan, and Parsabad-e-Moghan municipalities, workers of Jahan Vegetable Oil Factory, South Pars Gas Field workers, workers of the Saham-e-Edalat cooperative company, nurses of Namazi Hospital in Shiraz, technical workers of Iran Railways, workers of Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Agro-Industry, Tehran subway, and Mashhad telecommunications had unpaid wages during this month.

Moreover, some of the workers in Iran Powder Metallurgy Complex, factories in Asaluyeh and Pars Saveh tire factory were fired or laid off this month. 500 workers of factories in Qazvin province were suspended and 800 workers were laid off in Asaluyeh as well. On the other hand, 52 workers died or were injured because of negligence in the oversight of safety conditions in their workplaces.

Three prominent labor activists, Behnam Ebrahimzadeh, Jafar Azimzadeh, and Parvin Mohammadi were detained. The request of temporary release on bail for Parvin Mohammadi was denied by the Branch 102 of Fardis’s Criminal Court. Esmail Bakhshi, the detained labor activist of Haft Tappeh, faced three new charges: “spreading lies”, “propaganda against the state”, and “insulting to authorities”. Esmail Bakhshi’s attorney, Farzaneh Zilabi was summoned to the Branch three of the Shush county’s Revolutionary and General prosecutor’s office. In the same month, officers of Shush prosecutor’s office physically attacked Bakhshi’s sister and handcuffed his mother. This happened when his family was following up on his lawsuit. Later the family of this labor activist were summoned to the court.

In February, the attorney of several workers of Arak HEPCO reported that the cases of seven workers of this company were transferred to the Revolutionary Court. In 2018, 15 workers were sentenced to prison and lashes after last year’s protests. The appellate session of Davood Razaei, a board member of the syndicate of workers of Tehran and suburbs bus company, was held in the Branch 36 of Tehran Appellate Court. He was sentenced to five years in prison by the Branch 26 of the Revolution Court. Eghbal Shabani, labor activist in Sanandaj was arrested and Zaniar Dabaghian, another labor activist from Sanandaj, was sentenced to one-year prison term. A journalist was arrested in Qazvin because of reporting workers’ news in this month.

 

Monthly Report of Workers in Iran in March 2019

Several workers and activists were arrests, summoned, sentenced, received lash sentences, and were fired during this month.  Because of the lack of work safety, many workers died or were injured. Also, it has been stated that tens of thousands of workers encountered financial hardship because of their unpaid wages.

47 workers died or were injured because of negligence in the oversight of safety conditions in their workplaces. The workers of Takestan Wire company, Ajand construction company, Chame Shir dam in Gachsaran, Travers technical buildings lines, Andimeshk municipality, Choghazanbil world heritage site, Kurdistan’s Zagros Steel Contractors, and Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Agro-Industry have unpaid wages in this month.

Ali Kashefi, chairman of Mashhad laundries union, reported that 50 businesses were closed, and their workers were unemployed; due to last year’s high inflation. Some of the waste collectors of Sadra municipality who already have three months of unpaid wages and were protesting for their unpaid wages were fired. At the middle of March, which is the Persian new year, chairman of the pioneers of labor union of workers society announced that at least 97300 workers had unpaid wages prior to the New Year’s Eve.

Jafar Azimzadeh, chairman of the Free Workers Union was sentences to 30 lashes. Parvin Mohammadi, vice president of this union was released on bail. Meanwhile, Esmail Bakhshi was transferred from Shush prison to Sheiban prison in Ahvaz.

Moreover, several citizens were arrested protesting against firing waste collectors of Sadra municipality. Rahim Khodabakhshi, general secretary of Shiraz University’s Arman union, Ehsan Ziaraty, head of Shiraz University’s Basij Student Organization, and Hamid Mohammadpour, former secretary of Arman union were among the detainees. Ebrahim Abbasmanjazi, one of the workers of Haft Tappeh was summoned to Shush’s prosecutor’s interrogating office by a notice. After interrogation and charging accusations, he was temporarily released.

The Banch 36 of Tehran’s Appeals Court sentenced Davood Razavi, member of Tehran ‌Bus Company’s workers’ labor union board, to five years in prison. According to the verdict, this decision is suspended for five years. Also, Maziar Seyyednejad, a labor activist who was arrested 3 months ago for workers’ protests in Khuzestan, was released from Sheiban prison of Ahvaz on bail until completion of the juristic process. He was treated terribly during his prison time.

Two other labor activists, Ghodratollah Jalalvand and Reza Amjadi, were arrested in this month by security officials and were moved to an unknown location. Reza Amjadi was released after a few days by bail until completion of the juristic process.

 

Monthly Report of Workers in Iran in April 2019

One of the most important news in this month was arresting and summon of labor activists and the security authorities’ pressure to prevent celebratory events for the international Labor Day. Tehran Bus Company’s workers’ union invited workers to protest by the Parliament building on May 1st. Some of the businesses were shut down and a lot of workers were laid off in this month, because of high inflation and rising costs of production.

105 workers died or were injured because of the lack of work safety. The worker of Oshnavieh municipality, Iran Powder Metallurgy factory, Ilam industrial slaughterhouse, Tehran Metro lines 1 and 4 services, Ahvaz Steel,Rasht and Sari municipalities, Cement production factory of Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, Iranian railway company, Dehdasht hospital, Iran telecommunication company, and teachers of the schools outside Iran had unpaid wages this month. Chief executive officer of Hamshahri institute, the official news agency of Tehran municipality, stated that 104 of this institute’s personnel were laid off. 50 workers of Mojan engineering company, construction contractor of the central sewage treatment plant in the Bandar Emam petrochemical plant and 35 other workers in Keyvan food industries in Hamadan province were laid off.

Executive secretary of Mazandaran province worker’s house announced Neka Choob company was out of business and its workers were laid off. Tehran Bus Company’s workers’ union invited the workers to attend a protest by the Parliament on May 1st, in commemoration of the international Labor Day.

Amir Amirgholi, Sanaz Allahyari and Amirhosein Mohammadifar, members of “Gam”, a labor right defendant magazine, were detained. Thus, detention was one of the most important news on workers in April. Amir Amirgholi and Esmail Bakhshi were transferred from Ahvaz prisons to Evin prison in Tehran and their investigation trial was held in the Evin prosecutor’s office. Three labor activists, Ghaleb Hoseini, Mozafar Salehnia and Ahmad Taghizadeh, in the cities of Sanandaj and Urmiah were summoned by these cities ‘security authorities before labor’s day. Twelve labor activists in Jahannama Park of Karaj were arrested as well. Four of them, Parvin Mohammadi, Valeh Zamani, Alireza Saghafi, and Haleh Safarzadeh, were detained.

 

Monthly Report of Workers in Iran in May 2019

‏ The most important news in this month was the arrest of more than 50 labor activists and citizens on the international labor’s day celebration in May, by the Parliament. Meanwhile, hundreds of workers were laid off because of businesses’ shut down. In this month, Reza Shahabi attended the General Conference of Labor in Dijon/France.

106 workers died or were injured because of negligence in the oversight of safety conditions in their workplaces. On the other hand, more than 50 workers of “Navard Ivan” steel company who were working for more than 10 years in this factory, were laid off because of this factory being out of business. Also, more than 100 workers of Mahshahr Pipe Mill and Kurdistan Alborz tire, and 140 workers of Mahshahr petrochemical plant were laid off in this month. Meanwhile, 263 laid off workers of Asaluyeh South Pars, who had unpaid wages and premiums, wrote a letter to the minister of oil and demanded their rights. They wrote in their letter, that they “collect bread waste” for living.

‏In this month, Reza Shahabi attended the 52nd  Congress of the General Confederation of Labor in Dijon/France as the representative of the Tehran Bus Company’s workers’ union. He reported that Farahnaz Shiri, the first female bus driver in Tehran Bus Company was fired because of her gender. He also spoke about the problems and limitations of workers in this company.

‏Unpaid wages of the teachers around the country, workers of Ghoo vegetable oil company of Tehran, Ilam slaughterhouse, RSTC of Arak, Tabriz, and Shazand, Mahabad and Tabas municipalities, sugar beet farmers of Naghdeh sugar production company, coal mine workers of Malach Aram mine, physicians of Yazd University of Medical Sciences, and Karj Imam Khomeini hospital workers, wee one of the other problems which workers were encountering this month.

‏More than 50 people were arrested during the international labor day’s ceremony which was held by the Parliament. Despite release of some of the detainees by bail, some others like Marzie Amiri, Keyvan Samimi, Hasan Saidi, Atefe Rangriz, Nasrin Javadi, Nahid Khodaju, Neda Naji and Farhad Sheykhi were in custody, being in prions for about a month.

Representatives of labor unions of many countries around the world attending the 52nd Congress of the General Confederation of Labor in Dijon/France and Amnesty International, released two separated statements and demanded setting detainees of international Labor Day free without any conditions. Cases of labor activists, Esmail Bakhshi, Sepideh Gholian, Amir Amirgholi, Sanaz Allahyari, Amirhossein Mohammadifar, Asal Mohammadi and Ali Nejati, were sent to the Tehran’s Revolution Court. Although a bond was set for the detainees, the head of Evin prosecutor’s office prevented their release on bail. In addition, two labor activists in Sanandaj, Tofigh Mohammadi and Eghbal Shabani, were sentenced to two years in prison. More than 10 workers of Haft Tappeh were arrested or summoned by security authorities. There exact number of these workers is not known. They were arrested or summoned because of protesting the Islamic Labor Council of Haft Tappeh. Eshagh Rouhi, a labor activist from Sanandaj who was arrested at the same time of international Labor Day, was unable to pay the set bail and was held in prison. The trial of labor activist, Maziar Seyyednejad, was held in this month by the Revolution Court of Ahvaz.

 

A Daily Overview of Human Rights Violations in Iran for December 11, 2018

The following is an overview of human rights violations in Iran on December 11th, 2018 based on the information compiled and verified by Human Rights Activists NewsAgency a(HRANA).

(1) Esmail Bakhshi Faced New Accusations by the Public Prosecutor’s Office

(2) The Defenders of Human Rights Center Awarded the Human Rights Prize to the Teachers Association of Iran

(3) All Rock Concerts Set to be Performed in the Azadi Tower Were Canceled

(4) Reza Shahabi and Few Other Members of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company Were Arrested; the Self-immolation of a Worker

(5) Arash Keykhosravi Was Released

(6) Mohammad Habibi, An Imprisoned Teacher is Suffering from not Receiving Proper Medical Care

(7) Asghar Firouzi, a Former Political Activist, Was Arrested in Mashhad

(8) Abbas Lesani’s Family are Experiencing Financial Hardship

(9) Meysam Al-e Mehdi Was Arrested On the 32nd Day of the Protest of the Workers of Iran National Steel Industrial Group

(10) Two Azerbaijani Turkic Minority Rights Activists Were arrested in Urmia

(11) Five Workers Were Injured in Their Workplace in Last Two Days in Asaluyeh and Urmia

(12) A Classroom’s Ceiling Collapse at a Ramhormoz School Injured Two Students

(13) 38 Child Marriages in Eslamabad-e Gharb in Eight Months

(14) More from Iran

        

(1) Esmail Bakhshi Faced New Accusations by the Public Prosecutor’s Office

Farzaneh Zilabi, the defender lawyer of Esmail Bakhshi, the detained worker of Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Agro-Business, said that he has a new accusation and it will be investigated in branch 12 at the Revolutionary Court of Ahvaz. Zilabi added: my other case, Ali Nejati, Haft Tappeh Sugarcane Agro-Business union member who was arrested recently, has new accusations too.

(2) The Defenders of Human Rights Center Awarded the Human Rights Prize to the Teachers Association of Iran

The Defenders of Human Rights Center awarded the “Human Rights Activist” prize to the “Teachers Association of Iran”. The Defenders of Human Rights Center awards a symbolic statue of Cyrus’ Cylinder
every year on Human Rights Day.

(3) All Rock Concerts Set to be Performed in the Azadi Tower Were Canceled.

Farshad Ramezani the lead singer of Degardis group, confirmed the cancelation of all the planned rock concerts in Azadi tower. Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) reported that Ramezani confirmed the cancelation of his concert and added that Hooman Ajdari, Badzang, and Kanal’s groups concerts were also canceled. He believed this situation is caused by deviant behavior of the other rock groups who had performed earlier in Azadi tower and their fans actions.

(4) Reza Shahabi and Few Other Members of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company Were Arrested; the Self-immolation of a Worker

Reza Shahabi and Hassan Saeedi, members of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company and three other people were arrested. They were arrested on December 10 and  have been transferred to the Evin prison but were released on December 11.  In addition, In the last few days, a worker from this company committed suicide by self-immolation because of financial issues.

(5) Arash Keykhosravi Was Released

Arash Keykhosravi, the attorney at law was released on bail of 300 million Tomans [$25000]on December 11, 2018. Ghasem Sholesadi another lawyer was also released on bail on December 4th. These lawyers were sentenced to six years jail time on December 10 and their lawyers appealed to this verdict.

(6) Mohammad Habibi, An Imprisoned Teacher is Suffering from not Receiving Proper Medical Care

Mohammad Habibi did not receive proper medical care although the doctor diagnosed his kidney disease and requested his transfer to a hospital. Prison officers refused and deprived him from getting medical care.

(7) Asghar Firouzi, a Former Political Activist, Was Arrested in Mashhad

Asghar Firouzi,a political activist who spent his jail time before and after Islamic Revolution, was arrested on December 4th in his library in Mashhad suburbs by security forces and was transferred to an unknown place. The reasons behind his arrest were undisclosed.

(8) Abbas Lesani’s Family are Experiencing Financial Hardship

Abbads Lesani, a former political prisoner and an Azerbaijani Turkic minority rights activist who resides in Ardabil with his family is experiencing financial hardship. Security forces have shut down his son’s business repeatedly and his son-in-law, who was a contractor at Mohammad Bagher University in Tehran was expelled from his work. They have been notified that his contract was canceled.

(9) Meysam Al-e Mehdi Was Arrested On the 32nd Day of the Protest of the Workers of Iran National Steel Industrial Group

On the 32nd day of the protest of the workers of Iran National Steel Industrial Group, Meysam Al-e Mehdi was arrested. Moreover, the protest of the workers of the Iran National Steel Industrial Group is still ongoing and more than 10 workers were summoned and threatened.

(10) Two Azerbaijani Turkic Minority Rights Activists Were arrested in Urmia

On December 10, Reza Jafarzadeh and Akbar Gholizadeh, Azerbaijani Turkic minority rights activists, were arrested and they have been transferred to an unknown place.

(11) Five Workers Were Injured in Their Workplace in Last Two Days in Asaluyeh and Urmia

According to Iranian Labour News Agency (ILNA), the gas cylinder explosion in the Ethan production line in Asaluyeh injured four workers. Moreover, a construction worker in Urmia was severely injured in his workplace.

(12) A Classroom’s Ceiling Collapse at a Ramhormoz School Injured Two Students

Omid Hosseinzadeh, the head of Education department of Ramhormoz confirmed that on December 9, 2018 A classroom’s ceiling collapsed at a Ramhormoz school and two students were injured in this incident.

(13) 38 Child Marriages in Eslamabad-e Gharb in Eight Months

The governor of Eslamabad-e Gharb confirmed that there has been more than 1000 marriages registered in the last eight months of the current year. He said that in this city 38 child marriages were submitted. He encouraged families to go to counselling consulting the right age of marriage for their children which would significantly affect their future.

(14) More from Iran

A video was published on social media of a bear cub crying in Shiraz zoo to catch a piece of bread because of hunger attracts attention one more time to the poor animal care in Iran’s zoo.

Iranian Labour News Agency (ILNA) reported that Two park rangers were injured in an incident with poachers in Taleqan, a county in Alborz province.

Abdolmajid Bahramzehi, the Baluch political prisoner who was detained for the last seven months, has not made any contact with his family in last 53 days. In their last visit 53 days ago, he confirmed that he had been beaten by intelligence officers. His family are concerned about his situation.

Reza Shahabi Released by the End of His Sentence

HRANA News Agency – A prominent labor activist, Reza Shahabi, was released from Evin Prison by the end of his sentence. During his jail time, he went through several strokes and hunger strikes.

According to the report of Human Rights Activists News Agency in Iran (HRANA), Reza Shahabi, a prominent labor activist and member of the board of the syndicate of Bus Drivers Company was released from Evin Prison on March 13. Continue reading “Reza Shahabi Released by the End of His Sentence”

A Comprehensive Report on the Latest Developments in Rajai Shahr Prison

HRANA News Agency – An estimated number of 50 political prisoners held in Rajai Shahr prison in Karaj have been transferred to a new and security hall in recent weeks. There are the deprivations which have been imposed on prisoners in this hall where even the toilets are equipped with CCTV cameras. The situation has prompted political prisoners to protest. At least 16 prisoners are on hunger strike in a critical condition.
According to the report of Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA), 53 political-security prisoners detained in hall 12 of Rajai Shahr prison in Karaj were transferred to a hall which was previously rebuilt and developed by security forces, with the presence of a large number of prison guards, without prior notice on July 30, 2017. The hall is equipped with a large number of surveillance cameras and surveillance devices, as well as the shields that separate it from the rest of the prison.The families of these prisoners in the wake of their concern about the fate of their relatives, had referred to the judicial authorities who are responsible for this issue but these efforts had not resulted. Continue reading “A Comprehensive Report on the Latest Developments in Rajai Shahr Prison”