Update on Iranian-German Nahid Taghavi’s Condition in Evin Prison

HRANA, Human Rights Activists News Agency – Nahid Taghavi, an Iranian-German citizen, is currently serving her sentence in Evin Prison, where her health condition continues to deteriorate. She is being denied access to essential medical care despite her urgent needs.

Renowned human rights activist Narges Mohammadi, who has had the opportunity to observe Taghavi’s condition, expressed her concerns, saying, “This is the second time I have seen 68-year-old Mrs Taghavi in prison. The pain is evident on her face. She rarely leaves her bed, except to visit the prison infirmary to receive a strong pain reliever injection.”
On October 16, 2020, security forces arrested Taghavi at her residence in Tehran, subsequently subjecting her to solitary confinement in IRGC’s Ward 2A of Evin Prison. After enduring five long months in isolation, she was eventually transferred to the Women’s Ward within Evin Prison. Out of her 220 days of incarceration, she has spent a staggering 200 days in solitary confinement.

Since her arrest, she has undergone eighty interrogations, totalling nearly one thousand hours of questioning.
Ultimately, the Tehran Revolutionary Court, under the jurisdiction of Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced her to ten years and eight months in prison on charges of “accomplice in running illegal groups and propaganda against the regime.”

Despite suffering from severe spinal injuries and carpal tunnel syndrome, Taghavi has consistently been denied adequate medical care and the ability to make phone calls to her family, further exacerbating her already dire situation.

Report on Political Prisoners’ Conditions in Women’s Ward of Evin Prison

Currently, 24 women are being held at the women’s ward of Evin Prison in Tehran for political and alleged national security charges. This report provides an updated list of these prisoners along with their latest conditions, including the multiple health issues some are facing due to enduring long-term sentences or being beaten during detention.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, there are 24 women being held for political charges in the women’s ward of Evin Prison in Tehran.

During incarceration, they have experienced solitary confinement, frequent interrogation, being charged with new accusations, lack of adequate medical care, and being denied family visitation and phone calls. They have also been co-housed with prisoners who have committed violent crimes.

Among these prisoners, Mahvash Shahriari Sabet, Fariba Kamalabadi, Niloufar Bayani, Sepideh Kashani, Nahid Taghavi and Zahra Zehtabchi, among others, have spent a significant part of their incarceration in solitary confinement.

Many of these inmates are mothers including Zarha Zehtabchi, Narges Mohammadi, Faezeh Hashemi Rafsanjani, Maliheh Nazari, Samin Ehsani, and Narges Mansouri.
Since prisoners’ conditions are changing constantly, particularly after the recent mass releases under the “pardon and commute” directive, this report provides an updated list of the political prisoners in this ward.

Bahareh Hedayat

Bahareh Hedayat
Bahareh Hedayat

Bahareh Hedayat, age 41, is serving her four-year and eight-month sentence. She was arrested and detained several times for her civil activities on June 12, 2006, July 9, 2007, July 13, 2008, and March 21, 2009.
On December 30, 2009, she was arrested again. After a few months of detention in Ward 209 of Evin Prison, she was sentenced to seven years and six months in prison. Next year, she received additional six months for writing an open letter.

By the midwinter of 2016, according to Article 134 of the Islamic Penal code, Hedayat had served out her time. Yet, judicial authorities refused to set her free by ordering her two-year suspended sentence, received in 2007, to be served. She was eventually released from jail on September 4, 2016, after serving six years and six months for all accumulated sentences.

On October 3, 2019, security forces arrested Hedayat amid the 2019–2020 Iranian protests. Subsequently, the Tehran Revolutionary Court sentenced her to four years and eight months, two years banned from membership in political and civil groups, and penal labor in a nursing home for three months.
Lastly, on October 3, 2022, Hedayat was arrested amid 2022 nationwide protests, and on November 6 was jailed in Evin Prison to start her sentence received in 2019.
Currently, Hedayat is serving the second moths of her prison term. She has been held in solitary confinement for seven months.

Akram Nasirian

Akram Nasirian
Akram Nasirian

On April 29, 2019, security forces arrested Nasirian in Tehran and detained her in solitary confinement under interrogation in Evin Prison for 20 days. In Late May, she was relocated to double cell solitary in this ward.
On May 26, 2019, she was released on 200-million-toman bail until the end of legal proceedings.

On September 4, 2019, along with Nahid Shaghaghi, Nasirian was summoned to the Evin Courthouse investigation office, presided by Judge Nasiripour.

The Branch 26 of Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced Nasirian and three other women’s rights activists, Asrin Darkaleh, Maryam Mohammadi and Nahid Shaghaghi, each to four years and two months. These verdicts were reduced to two years and three months after the defendants waived their rights to appeal.

In March 2020, Nasirian and three other women’s rights activists were summoned to Evin Courthouse for sentencing, which was postponed until April 3, 2022, due to the Head of Judiciary’s directive to keep health prisons condition in control during the Covid-19 pandemic. Eventually, in August 2022, they were jailed in Evin Prison to start serving their sentences.

Nasirian, 60 years old, a resident of Tehran, is a member of The Call of the Iranian Women NGO.

Sepideh Gholian

Sepideh Gholian
Sepideh Gholian

On November 18, 2018, Sepideh Gholian was arrested along with at least 19 others, including members of the Assembly of Representatives of Haft-Tappeh (Sugarcane Agro-Industry Company) workers, and several workers’ activists by Public Security Police in Shush city. She was released on bail after one month.

On January 19, 2019, Iran’s state TV aired a report showing some written statements signed by Gholian and others, including Esmail Bakhshi, and Ali Nejati (a member of the managing board of the labor union representing Haft Tappeh workers), confessing their connection with Marxist anti-regime Groups outside the country.
In response, Bakhshi and Gholian announced that these confessions were extracted under torture during their interrogation by the Ministry of Intelligence agents and other security forces. Both Judiciary and the Ministry of Intelligence dismissed their statements and arrested them just a few hours later.
On  October 26, 2019, Gholian was released on bail until the end of legal proceedings. On December 14, 2019, the Tehran Court of Appeals sentenced her to five years imprisonment. On June 21, 2020, she was arrested after an appearance at Evin Courthouse and jailed in Evin Prison for sentencing.

On June 21, 2020, Gholian was transferred from Evin to Bushehr Prison in exile, despite her frequent request to be relocated to Sepidar Prison in Ahvaz, where her family lives.
On November 16, 2022, an investigation branch of the Public and Revolutionary prosecutor office in Tehran briefed her on the charges of “spreading falsehood, blasphemy, insulting, slandering, and accusing the government officials.”

Civil rights activist Gholian, age 29, has spent a total of 80 days in solitary confinement. She went three times on a hunger strike while in prison. During her incarceration, many times, she has been denied adequate medical treatment and attacked by prisoners of violent crimes.

Samin Ehsani

Samin Ehsani
Samin Ehsani

On August 17, 2011, Baha’i citizen Samin Ehsani, age 37, a children’s rights activist, was arrested at Evin Courthouse, where she was for resolving some passport issues. After that, security forces raided and searched her house and confiscated some of her belongings, including her computer and materials related to the Baha’i faith.

Ehsani spent her first eleven days of detention in solitary confinement in Ward 2A of Evin Prison and then was relocated to a multiple-occupancy cell in this ward.

She was released on 185-million-toman bail after one month.

On June 9, 2012, Branch 28 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Mohammad Moghiseh, sentenced her to five years in prison. On June 15, 2022, she was jailed in Evin prison to begin serving her sentence.

In recent years, Eshani has been engaging in educational activities by holding educational courses for Afghan children who are unable to go to school. On trial, such activities were presented as an example of the charges.

In prison, Ehsani was denied proper medical care after contracting Covid-19. Prison officials refused to dispatch her to the hospital. In total, Ehsani endured 25 days in solitary confinement.

 

Zahra Zehtabchi

Zahra Zehtabchi
Zahra Zehtabchi

Along with her husband and daughter, Zahra Zehtabchi was arrested on October 16, 2013. She was relocated to the women’s ward of Evin prison after enduring 14 months in solitary confinement in Ward 209. On December 8, 2014, Branch 15 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Salavati, sentenced her to 12 years in prison for “armed insurrection against the regime (Baghi)” and “enmity against God (Moharebeh).” This verdict was reduced to 10 years on appeal by applying Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code.

After her arrest, her husband Javad Khosh-Niyat was arrested and detained for 22 days following an inquiry about his wife’s condition.
 
Zehtabchi was arrested and detained for a few days in 2009 while she was surveying people’s opinions on presidential election results on behalf of the University of Tehran.
Zehtabchi, age 53, is a mother of two daughters, aged 17 and 24. She has been on furlough only once for three days in the third year of her sentence.
She is currently spending the ninth year of her sentence. She was held for 14 months in solitary confinement in IRGC’s detention facility known as Ward 2A of Evin Prison.

Narges Mohammadi

Narges Mohammadi
Narges Mohammadi

Narges Mohammadi was arrested for the first time in 2002 and released after one week. She received one year in this legal case.

In June 2010, Mohammadi was arrested again and held in solitary confinement in Ward 209 of Evin Prison. Next month, she was released on 100-million-toman bail. Next year, she was sentenced to 11 years for “assembly and collusion against national security” and “propaganda against the regime.” The verdict was reduced to 6 years on appeal.

In 2012, Mohammadi was arrested for starting her six-year sentence. After one month in solitary confinement and four months in Zanjan Prison in exile, she was released due to her disease and penal intolerance. In May 2015, she was rearrested and jailed in the women’s ward of Evin Prison to continue serving her six-year sentence. Moreover, she faced more charges in a new legal case.

In this new legal case, she was sentenced to 16 years for “forming an illegal group known as Legam (a campaign planning steps toward abolishing the death penalty)” and “propaganda against the regime.”
Applying article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code made ten years for one charge enforceable.

Mohammadi, age 46 and a mother of two children, is denied any phone call to her husband living abroad. She suffers from pulmonary embolism and muscular paralysis. On September 29, 2018, she was granted a medical furlough for three days.

On January 12, 2019, she and Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe went on a hunger strike in protest against inadequate medical treatment. After two days, they ended their hunger strike following prison officials’ promises.

On May 14, 2019, she was dispatched to a hospital to undergo surgery (hysterectomy- a surgical procedure to remove the uterus). Twelve days later, she was returned to prison although she still needed medical care.

On February 22, 2020, while serving her 16-year sentence, Mohammadi faced two new legal cases. One for “publishing political statements, holding educational classes and sit-down strike in the women’s ward of Evin Prison.” The second case was opened against her following the head of Evin Prison Gholamreza Ziaei’s complaint because he was allegedly accused of “torture and beating” by Mohammadi. In this case, Mohammadi was also accused of “disturbing prison order through singing songs aloud.”

On April 17, 2020, Mohammadi’s lawyer Mahmood Behzadirad informed the public that his client’s request for furlough and release on probation was rejected despite her suffering from mental and physical illness. Moreover, Mohammadi was held in the same with prisoners of violent crimes and had been threatened with death by one of them.
On October 8, 2020, Mohammadi was released from prison after serving five-and-a-half years.

On November 16, 2021, Mohammadi was arrested again during a ceremony honoring Ebrahim Ketabdar, who was killed by security forces in Karaj during the November 2019 protests. Six days later, she was briefed on new charges and then held in solitary confinement in Evil Prison. Thereafter, she was transferred to Qarchak Prison, Varamin.

In January 2022, the Tehran Revolutionary Court sentenced her to eight years in prison, 74 lashes, two years exile and other social deprivations. Following her refusal not to appeal the conviction, the Revolutionary Court announced this sentence final.
While in prison, she faced a new legal case opened by Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court. For this case, she received 15 months for “propaganda against the regime and monthly reporting to the police for two years. She was also banned from leaving the country, membership in civil and political groups for two years and doing cleaning service at penal labour in abandoned urban areas for four hours a day for three months.”

On April 12, 2022, prison officials denied her the medicine she had to use on a daily basis. She could receive these medicine only after 20 days.

Mohammadi, age 50, has been subjected to violence many times by prison guards and prisoners of violent crimes. Despite having heart disease, she has been denied medical care and medicine. She was held for a total of five months in solitary confinement.

Sara Ahmadi

Sara Ahmadi
Sara Ahmadi

On June 13, 2020, security forces arrested Sara Ahmadi and her spouse Homayoun Zhaveh at their rental vacation lodge in Amol, Mazandaran Province. She was released on 300-million-toman bail from Evin Prison. Zhaveh was released on a bail of 200 million tomans on August 24, 2020.

On November 11, 2020, the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced Ahmadi and Zhaveh to 11 and 3 years in prison, respectively.

On October 9, 2020, the Tehran Court of Appeals sentenced Ahmadi to eight years for “running illegal Zionist evangelical Christian groups.” and Zahveh to three years for the same charge. This Christian convert couple was also banned from leaving the country, membership in political parties and civil groups for two years and service work for people with disabilities four hours a day for six months.
On March 19, 2021, they were summoned to Eving courthouse to begin serving their sentences.
Christian convert Sara Ahmadi, age 44, has been held in solitary confinement for 67 days.

Sepideh Kashani

Sepideh Kashani
Sepideh Kashani

Environmental activist Speideh (Hamideh) Kashan Doost (Kashani) and seven other activists were arrested by IRGC intelligence agents in January 2018 and taken to Ward 2A of Evin Prison.

In February 2019, Branch 15 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court postponed the court date to next year. In November 2019, this court, headed by Judge Salavati, sentenced Kashani to six years in prison for “collaboration with the hostile U.S. government.” Next months, after enduring 700 days of detention, she was relocated to the women’s ward of Evin Prison to start serving her sentence.

On February 18, 2020, Branch 36 of the Tehran Court of Appeals, presided by Judge Ahmad Zargar, upheld the verdict.
 
Kashani, an environmental activist and an expert at the Parsian Wildlife Institute, age 50, was held in solitary confinement for two years. She spent eight months in solitary confinement in Ward 2A of Evin Prison at IRGC’s disposal. So far, she has been granted two times prison furloughs.
During her incarceration, she has been denied proper medical care, phone calls and visitation.


Niloufar Bayani

Niloufar Bayani
Niloufar Bayani

In January 2018, IRGC intelligence agents arrested environmental conservationist Niloufar Bayani, along with other activists, and took them to Ward 2A of Evin Prison, Tehran. During detention, she was subjected to pressure and sexual harassment to make coerced confessions against herself and other co-defendants.

After holding a few court sessions, in February 2019, Branch 15 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court postponed the trial to next year. In November 2019, this court, headed by Judge Salavati, sentenced her to ten years in prison for “collaboration with the hostile U.S. government.”

Next months, after being held in IRGC’s Ward 2A, she was relocated to the women’s ward of Evin Prison to start serving her sentence. The verdict was upheld on appeal.

In the winter of 2020, in an open letter, Bayani revealed that IRGC interrogators tortured her mentally and physically, and sexually harassed her during at least 1200 hours of interrogation. Earlier in April 2019, HRANA had disclosed sexual harassment, torture and threats against the defendants, including Bayani, to extract confessions.

Due to publishing this open letter, she was pressed with new charges on which she was briefed in Evin Courthouse.
Bayani is a former expert at the Parsian Wildlife Institute. Currently, she is serving the fifth year of her sentence in Evin Prison. She has spent two years of her ten-year sentence in Ward 2A, a detention facility at IRGC’s disposal.

Shakila Monfared

Shakila Monfared
Shakila Monfared

On August 31, 2020, security forces arrested Monfared in Tehran while she was leaving her house and took her to an IRGC detention facility.
Nine days later, she was relocated to the women’s ward of Evin Prison after completing interrogation. On September 14, 2020, she was released on bail from Evin Prison.

The branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced her to six years for “propaganda against the regime and blasphemy.” She was also ordered to do penal labor in the Ministry of Agriculture Jihad for four months. Eventually, Branch 36 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court reduced her sentence to four years and two months.

On May 2, 2021, Monfared was transferred from Evin prison to Qarchak Prison in Varamin in exile. After that, she received additional two years and eight months on the charge of “membership in anti-regime groups” and a 10-million-toman fine for “spreading falsehood.”

Following a complaint filed by the Prisons and Security and Corrective Measures Organization for their refusal to be transferred to the court from prison with handcuff, Monfared and 13 other political prisoners faced a new legal case opened by Branch 3 of Evin Courthouse. She was pressed with “disturbing public order and peace, assembly and collusion against the regime, insulting regime officials and disobeying prison officials.”

Monfared, age 29, a resident of Tehran, endured 72 days of solitary confinement. Despite suffering from digestive disease and severe stomach pain, she has been denied adequate medical care. During her incarceration, she was granted furlough only one time.
 

During this time, Monfared was deprived of visitation and phone calls for two months. She went on a hunger strike and refusal to take medicine to protest against being cohoused with prisoners of violent crimes and lack of medical care.

 

Fariba Kamalabadi

Fariba Kamalabadi
Fariba Kamalabadi

On May 14, 2008, Kamalabadi was arrested in Tehran and held in solitary confinement for 27 months in Ward 209 of Evin Prison. On August 8, 2010, she went on trial with six other members of a Baha’i group known as the “Yaran e Iran” or “Friends of Iran,” which addressed the spiritual and social needs of the Baha’i community. Branch 28 of the Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Mohammad Moghiseh, sentenced her to 20 years in prison. The next day after the trial, she and Mahvash Shahriari Sabet were jailed in exile in Rajai Shahr Prison in Karaj.

In May 2011, Kamalabadi was relocated to Qarchak Prison in Varamin and a week later to the women’s ward of Evin Prison. In 2011, by applying the Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, her sentence was reduced to ten years.
 
Kamalabadi suffers from lumbar disc disease. However, during her incarceration, she has been granted furlough only once. During the leave, she met Faezeh Hashemi Rafsanjani causing outcry among the regime’s authorities and media inside Iran.

On October 31, 2017, she was set free from Evin Prison after serving her ten-year sentence.

On July 31, 2022, security forces arrested Kamalabadi and another member of “Yaran e Iran” Mahvash Shahriari Sabet in Tehran. Subsequently, Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, headed by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced each of these Baha’is to 10 years for “running a society of the deviant sect (a terminology used by Iran’s regime to refer to the Baha’is) in the purpose of acting against national security.”

Kamalabadi, age 60, is a resident of Tehran.

Faezeh Hashemi Rafsanjani

Faezeh Hashemi Rafsanjani
Faezeh Hashemi Rafsanjani

In the aftermath of the 2009 Iranian election protests, Faezeh Hashemi Rafsanjani was arrested twice for a few hours on June 20, 2009, and February 20, 2011.

The Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Salavati, sentenced Hashemi Rafsanjani to six months in prison for “propaganda against the regime.” She was also banned from membership in political parties and groups, presence in media and civil activities on social media. This verdict was upheld on appeal.

On September 22, 2012, security forces arrested and jailed her in the women’s ward of Evin Prison to begin serving her sentence.

While in prison, she faced a new legal case for her protests against the women’s ward issues. Accused of “insulting the Supreme Leader” and “disturbing prison order,” she was sentenced to three weeks of punitive isolation in Ward 209 and deprived of visitation.

On September 27, 2022, security forces arrested this political activist again in Tehran. She received 15 months for “propaganda against the regime” and 37 months for “blasphemy.”

Hashemi Rafsanjani, born on 7 January 1963, is a former member of the Iranian parliament from 1996 to 2000, and a member of the Executives of Construction Party. She was held for 38 days in solitary confinement.

Fatemeh Mosanna

Fatemeh Mosanna
Fatemeh Mosanna

On January 28, 2013, the Ministry of Intelligence agents arrested Fatemeh Mosanna, age 53, along with her husband, Hassan Sadeghi, and her child. She was held in solitary confinement in Ward 209 of Evin prison for 75 days and then relocated to the women’s ward.

On January 13, 2014, she was released on bail. After that, Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court sentenced the couple each to 15 years in prison on the charges of  “armed insurrection against the regime (Baghi)” and “enmity against God (Moharebeh),” through advocating People’s Mojahedin Organization (MEK). The court also ordered the seizure of their shop and house. On September 30, 2015, she was arrested and jailed in the women’s ward of Evin Prison to begin serving her sentence.

Mosanna is the mother of two children who are currently living with their grandmother. Mosanna is deprived of having a furlough despite suffering from intestinal colitis and severe migraine. Since February 2019, she could see her husband, imprisoned in Rajai Shahr Prison, only three times. The Their last visitation was in May 2019. While other inmates can have visitation regularly, she is allowed visitation only with Amin Vaziri’s permission, an assistant prosecutor overseeing prisoners. This ban violates the rules governing prison visits, entitling prisoners to have family visitation even if they are housed in separate prisons.

In March 2019, the agents of the Execution of Imam Khomeini seized this couple’s shop and then in May 2020, they seized their house.
 
Despite suffering from sciatic nerve pain, intestinal colitis and severe migraine, many times, Mosanna was denied proper medical care and treatment in a hospital outside the prison.

When Mosanna was only 13 years old, she spent three years in jail with her mother. During this period, her three brothers Ali, Mostafa and Morteza, as well as the wife of one of her brothers, were executed for the charge of “enmity against God” and “advocating for The People’s Mujahedin Organization of Iran.”

 

Vida Rabbani

Vida Rabbani
Vida Rabbani

Vida Rabbani, a journalist and member of the Union of Islamic Iran People Party, was arrested several arrests in 2020, 2021 and 2022 over to her participation in protest gatherings regarding some issues in Afghanistan and the crash of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, which was shot by IRGC’s missile.

Branch 36 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court sentenced Rabbani to five years for “blasphemy,” four years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” eight months for “propaganda against the regime,” and eight months for “disturbing in public order.” Moreover, she was banned from civil activities on social media, gatherings and political activities. The verdict is upheld on appeal. Based on the Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, five years for one charge is enforceable.
Amid the 2022 nationwide protests, Rabbani was arrested again and sentenced to six years and 15 months in prison for “assembly and collusion against national security” and “propaganda against the regime.”
Rabbani, age 34, was held in solitary confinement for 70 days.

Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee

Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee
Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee

On September 6, 2014, Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee and her husband Arash Sadeghi were arrested. She was held in an IRGC detention facility A.k.A “Safehouse” and then transferred to IRGC’s Ward 2A, in Evin Prison. After 20 days, she was released on an 800-million-toman bail.

Ebrahimi Iraee and Arash Sadeghi began serving their sentence on October 24, 2016, in Evin Prison. While serving her sentence in prison, she and Atena Daemi faced a new legal case. On April 8, 2019, she was released from prison after serving her sentence. However, she had to provide bail for the second case.

For this new legal case, Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court sentenced her and Daemi to three years and seven months. Moreover, both were banned from membership in political groups and parties. These verdicts were upheld on appeal. According to their lawyer, by applying the Article 134 of the Islamic Penal Code, two years and one month were enforceable to them.

On November 9, 2019, about ten agents raided her house and arrested Iraee without showing any arrest warrant. They took her to the Evin Judgement enforcement unit to begin serving her sentence in Evin Prison. The head of Evin Prison, Gholamreza Ziaei, refused to house Iraee in Evin Prison. After one day, Amin Vaziri, an assistant prosecutor overseeing prisoners, unlawfully ordered the transfer of Ireaee to Qarchak Prison, Varamin.
Since her incarceration in Qarchak Prison, Iraee has not been allowed to call or meet her spouse, Arash Sadeghi, a civil rights activist imprisoned in Rajai Shahr Prison.

On December 7, 2020, Iraee was summoned to an IRGC detention facility for interrogation. As an inmate serving her sentence, Iraee called this summons against the law and refused to go. Following her refusal, the prison guards beat her and took her forcefully to the detention facility, where she was interrogated for 43 days. After a while, she was transferred to Amol prison in exile. Meanwhile, security agents searched her house.

While she was in Amol prison, in a trial in absentia, Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced her to one year for “propaganda against the regime.” She was also banned from leaving the country for two years and from membership in political groups. Throughout the trial, she was denied access to a lawyer.

On May 9, 2022, Iraee was set free from Amol prison. However, she was rearrested violently at her home in Tehran on September 26, 2022. During the arrest, the agents searched her house.
On November 17, 2022, Iraee was briefed on the charges of “assembly and collusion against national security” and “propaganda against the regime” at Branch 2 of Evin Courthouse, presided by Judge, Mahmood Haj Moradi.
This political prisoner has been transferred from Qarchak Prison to the women’s ward of Evin Prison. The reason for her relocation is still unknown.
Iraee, age 42, had been held in solitary confinement for 79 days.

Malihe Nazari

Malihe Nazari
Malihe Nazari

On June 30, 2020, security forces arrested Christian convert Malihe Nazari at her home in Tehran and took her to Evin Prison. On July 22, 2020, she was transferred to Qarchak Prison, Varamin.

In early September 2020, she was released on 300-million-toman bail.

On June 7, 2021, Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court sentenced her to six years in prison for “forming illegal groups to act against national security, disrupting national security through preaching Evangelical Christianity and creating home churches.”

On August 30, 2022, she was jailed in Evin Prison to begin serving her sentence.

Nazari, age 50, is a mother of two sons, aged 22 and 15. She has been held in solitary confinement for 20 days.

 

Mahvash Shahriari Sabet

Mahvash Shahriari Sabet
Mahvash Shahriari Sabet

On March 5, 2008, Mahvash Shahriari Sabet was arrested in Mashhad. After enduring 13 months of solitary confinement in Mashhad, she was transferred to Evin Prison, where she was held in solitary confinement in Ward 209 for 27 months. In August 2010, Branch 28 of the Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Mohammad Moghiseh, sentenced her to 20 years in prison. The next day, she was relocated into exile in Rajai Shahr Prison, Karaj. In April-May 2011, she was relocated to Qarchak Prison in Varamin and the next week, to the women’s ward of Evin Prison.
During her incarceration, Shahriari Sabet has been granted a furlough only one time. In 2015, her sentence was reduced to 10 years.

On September 18, 2017, Shahriari Sabet was set free from Evin Prison after serving her ten-year sentence. During the first 20 months of her prolonged detention, she had not any access to a lawyer.
On July 31, 2022, security forces arrested her again and searched her house. Subsequently, Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, headed by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced her to 10 years in prison. Despite suffering from several diseases such as osteoporosis as a result of long-term incarceration, she does not have access to her required medicine. Since November 21, 2022, she has not been allowed to call her family or have visitation.

Nahid Taghavi

Nahid Taghavi
Nahid Taghavi

On October 16, 2020, security forces arrested Iranian-German national Nahid Taghavi, age 68, at her home in Tehran and took her to solitary confinement in IRGC’s Ward 2A, in Evin Prison.

After five months, she was relocated to the women’s ward of Evin Prison. Since her arrest, she has undergone about 1000 hours of interrogation during 80 sessions.

Many times, under different pretexts, she was sent from the women’s ward to Ward 2A and held in solitary confinement.

Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced her to 10 years and 8 months for “running illegal groups and propaganda against the regime.”

Despite the doctor’s order for back surgery and providing bail by her family, she was denied medical leave, until July 19, 2022, when she was finally dispatched to a hospital. However, despite unfinished treatment, she was sent back forcefully to prison on November 13, 2022.

Taghavi spent, in total, 200 out of her 220 days of incarceration in solitary confinement. During her detention and imprisonment, she has been denied to make a phone call and proper medical care.

Nasrin Javadi Khezri

Nasrin Javadi Khezri
Nasrin Javadi Khezri

On May 1, 2019, at a protest gathering on International Workers’ Day before the parliament, Nasrin (Azam) Javadi Khezri, along with dozens of protestors, were arrested. 28 days later, she was released on 100-million-toman bail from Qarchak Prison.

Afterwards, Branch 26 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court sentenced her to five years for “assembly and collusion against national security,” one year for “propaganda against the regime”, and one year for “disturbing public order.” She was also sentenced to 74 lashes, a ban from using smartphones, and membership in civil/political groups and parties.

The Court of Appeals sentenced her to five years for the first above-mentioned charge. On July 2, 2022, she began serving her sentence in Evin Prison.

Javadi and 13 other political prisoners face a new legal case, following the Prisons Organization’s complaint about these prisoners’ refusal to be handcuffed during the transfer to the court. Branch 3 of Evin Prosecutor’s Office charged them with “disturbing public order, assembly and collusion against the regime, insulting the authorities and contempt of prison officials.”
Javadi, age 65, was held in solitary confinement for 50 days.

Narges Mansouri

Narges Mansouri
Narges Mansouri

On August 12, 2019, security forces arrested Narges Mansouri while she was returning home from work. After 20 days of interrogation and being held in solitary confinement in the Ward 2A of Evin prison, she was transferred to Qarchak Prison in Varamin.

Following a three-day hunger strike, Mansouri was sent back to Evin Prison. On November 13, 2019, she was released on 500-million-toman bail until the end of legal proceedings.

In 2022, she was rearrested by security forces.

Mansouri is a civil rights activist and member of the Syndicate of Workers of Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company. She, age 46, is a mother of a 12-year-old child.

Mansouri was held for a total of 72 days in solitary confinement.

 

Maryam Haji Hosseini

Maryam Haji Hosseini
Maryam Haji Hosseini

In September 2019, security forces arrested Maryam Haji Hosseini and held her in a detention facility in Tehran for about six months under interrogation. In March 2020, she was relocated to the women’s ward of Evin Prison.

On April 22, 2020, Branch 15 of the Tehran Revolutionary Court, presided by Judge Salavati, held the first court session. Facing multiple charges including “spreading corruption on earth and spying for Israel,”  Haji Hosseini was sentenced to death. On appeal, this verdict was commuted to ten years in prison and paying the money received for spying.

Haji Hosseini, age 50, has been held in solitary confinement for 412 days.

 

 

Tahereh Bajrovani

Tahereh Bajrovani
Tahereh Bajrovani

On December 21, 2022, security forces arrested Tahereh Bajrovani at her workplace in Tehran and took her to Ward 209 of Evin Prison.

After 33 days, she was relocated to the women’s ward of Evin Prison after 33 days of interrogation.

The reason for her arrest and the allegation against her is still unknown.

Bajrovani’s husband, Ali Fotoohi Koohsare, was killed by regime forces during the 2019–2020 Iranian protests.

 

 

 

Masoumeh (Farah) Nasaji

The Revolutionary Court sentenced Masoumeh Nasaji to five years and four months in prison. The details of her legal case and the charges are still unknown.

Nasaji, age 60, has been held for 48 days in solitary confinement.

Negar Zarei

Negar Zarei, age 31, was sentenced to five years and one month in prison by the Revolutionary Court. The details of her legal case and the charges are still unknown.

She has been held for 21 days in solitary confinement.

 

 

HRA Highlights Sixty-Nine Dual and Foreign Nationals Detained by Iran From 2003 to Present 

HRANA – HRA has compiled a list of sixty-nine dual and foreign nationals detained by Iran since 2003. The list illustrates a deeply flawed judiciary plagued with the ongoing use of arbitrary detention fueled by an extraordinary lack of due process. It is noteworthy that in recent years a number of these arrests have been made by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC). It is overwhelmingly clear that Iran continues to use dual and foreign nationals as political bargaining chips, often charging individuals in connection with espionage and citing national security concerns—with an alarming lack of evidence. HRA has documented extensive evidence of unfair trials, often conducted in a language the accused does not understand, with the denial of legal counsel, disproportionate sentencing, prolonged solitary confinement, and interrogations marred with torture leading to forced and sometimes televised confessions. The list goes on. The UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention has commented on Iran’s trend of detaining dual nationals confirming that a number of those detained were targeted based on their “nationality or social origin”. 

The detention of dual and foreign nationals is seemingly targeted and systematic and it must be widely condemned. Iran cannot be allowed to use human beings as players in its political chessboard. Despite the foreign ministries’ November 2021 guarantee vowing the safety of dual nationals traveling to Iran, the continued practice and failure to release those currently detained sends a starkly opposite message to Iranians that enjoy dual nationality. A message that it is not safe to return to Iran without a well-founded fear of detention. There is no secret that Iran views dual nationals in this way. The case of Nazanin Zarcari Radcliffe is an unfortunate example of just how serious Iran takes the game. They view Nazanin as ransom for a four-hundred million pound debt owed by the United Kingdom daring back to a 1979 arms deal. It has become clear that Nazanin’s freedom hinges on the payment of said funds. She is not alone. There must be sustained international pressure to release Nazanin and all dual and foreign nationals currently detained by Iran. It’s a dangerous game when politics become more important than the very lives politicians were elected to serve. 

In a letter written from prison, currently detained dual national, Siamak Namazi said Iran’s continued use of hostage diplomacy was like “sprinkl[ing] salt on the wound of distrust.” This is surely a shared sentiment in numerous diplomatic circles attempting to tackle the issue.  

The following list documents sixty-nine dual and foreign nationals detained by Iran from 2003 to the present day. A number of those detained were released prior to the completion of their sentence–illustrating the arbitrariness of the practice. Some were never fortunate enough to return home and ultimately faced execution at the hands of their abductors. While several have been released a number still await a strategic move on the chessboard that has, unfortunately, become their reality. American, British, and Canadian citizens account for the highest number of detentions among dual nationals–the highest number of detentions occurring in 2016. It is worth noting that the actual number of detentions may be higher than reported. Dual national detentions significantly outnumber that of foreign nationals reaffirming the widespread distrust in Iran’s commitment to the safety of dual nationals wishing to “return home”.

(*) denotes the individual remains imprisoned in Iran or otherwise has been denied the ability to return home.

1. Zahra “Ziba” Kazemi-Ahmadabadi

Date of Arrest: June 24, 2003
Date of Release: Killed by Iranian officials following her arrest
Nationality: Iranian-Canadian
Charges: Photographing restricted areas
Conviction: N/A

 


2. Stephane Lherbier

Date of Arrest: November 6, 2005
Date of Release: January 2007
Nationality: French
Charges: Unknown
Conviction:Unknown

 


3. Donald Klein

Date of Arrest:  November 6, 2005
Date of Release: January, 2007
Nationality: German
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Unknown

 


4. Robert Alan Levinson

Date of Arrest: March 2007
Date of Release: Disappeared on March 9, 2007 on Kish Island, Iran
Nationality: American
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Unknown

 


5. Haleh Esfandiari

Date of Arrest: May 8, 2007
Date of Release: August 21, 2007
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges:  Acting against national security and acting to overthrow the regime
Conviction: Unknown

 


6. Hamid Ghasemi Shal

Date of Arrest: 2008
Date of Release: October 2013
Nationality: Iranian-Canadian
Charges: Espionage. In retrial, the charge was changed to assembly and collusion against national security
Conviction: Initially sentenced to death. Later, the verdict was reduced to 5 years imprisonment


7. Saeed Malekpour

Date of Arrest: October 2008
Date of Release: Released from prison before the end of his sentence
Nationality: Iranian-Resident of Canada
Charges: Cybercrime (Pornography)
Conviction: Life imprisonment

 


8. Hossein Derakhshan

Date of Arrest: November 1, 2008
Date of Release: November 19, 2015
Nationality: Iranian-Canadian
Charges: Collaboration with hostile countries, propaganda against the regime, advocating for anti-regime groups, blasphemy, setting up and directing websites with obscene content.
Conviction: 19 years and 6 months imprisonment, five year prohibition from membership and activity on social media


9. Roxana Saberi

Date of Arrest: January 31, 2009
Date of Release: May 11, 2009
Nationality: American
Charges: Espionage and gathering confidential and classified documents
Conviction: 2 years suspended imprisonment

 


10. Maziar Bahari

Date of Arrest: June 1, 2009
Date of Release:
October 13, 2009 
Nationality: 
Iranian-Canadian
Charges:
Assembly and collusion to act against national security, gathering and holding confidential and classified documents, propaganda against the regime, offensive statements against the Supreme Leader of Iran and the President, disturbing public order
Conviction:
13 years and six month imprisonment and 74 lashes


* 11. Fariba Adelkhah

Date of arrest: June 6, 2009
Date of release: Unknown
Citizenship: Iranian-French
Charges: Propaganda against the regime and collusion against national security
Sentence: 6 years and 6 months imprisonment

 


12. Clotilde Reiss

Date of Arrest: July 1, 2009
Date of Release: August 2009
Nationality: French
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: 5 years imprisonment, later changed to a fine when she left Iran on May 16, 2016

 


13. Kian Tajbakhsh

Date of Arrest: July 2009
Date of Release: March 13, 2010
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: 5 years imprisonment

 


14. Sarah Shourd

Date of Arrest: July 30, 2009
Date of Release: September 14, 2010
Nationality: American
Charges: Illegally entering the country and espionage
Conviction: Released on bail. She left Iran after her release.

 


15. Vahik Abramian

Date of Arrest: February 20, 2010
Date of Release: March 2011
Nationality: Iranian-Dutch
Charges: Preaching Christian beliefs
Conviction: One year in prison. He returned to the Netherlands after release.

 


16. Shane Bauer

Date of Arrest: September 14, 2010
Date of Release: December 27, 2011
Nationality: American
Charges: Illegally entering the country and espionage
Conviction: 8 years imprisonment

 


17. Josh Fattal

Date of Arrest: September 14, 2010
Date of Release: December 27, 2011
Nationality: American
Charges: Illegally entering the country and espionage
Conviction: 8 years imprisonment

 


18. Amir Mirza Hekmati

Date of Arrest: December 7, 2011
Date of Release: January 2016
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: Initially sentenced to death, later reduced to 10 years imprisonment. He was released through a prisoner swap with the U.S. Government


19. Masoud Karami

Date of Arrest: February 14, 2012
Date of Release: Unknown
Nationality: Iranian-Norwegian
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Unknown

 


20. Saeed Abedini

Date of Arrest: September 2012
Date of Release: Mid-January 2016
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Holding underground church services with the purpose of acting against national security
Conviction: 8 years in prison

 


21. Afshin Shafei

Date of Arrest: December 16, 2012
Date of Release: January 2013
Nationality: Iranian-Norwegian
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Released on bail and left the country

 


22. Roya Saberi Nejad Nikbakht

Date of Arrest: September 28, 2013
Date of Release: Unknown
Nationality: Iranian-British
Charges: Blasphemy and offensive statements against the heads of three branches of government.
Conviction: 4 years imprisonment

 


23-30. Seven Unidentified Slovak Citizens

Date of Arrest: July 2013
Date of Release: September 2013
Nationality: Slovak
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: Unknown

 


31. Jason Rezaian 

Date of Arrest: July 22, 2014
Date of Release:
January 2016
Nationality:
Iranian-American
Charges:
Espionage and acting against national security
Conviction:
Released though a prisoner swap. In return, the U.S. government released three Iranian prisoners.


* 32. Hasan Rastegari Majd

Date of Arrest: October 27, 2014
Date of Release: Imprisoned in Urmia Prison
Nationality: Iranian-Turkish
Charges: In the first case, “propaganda against the regime through collaboration with an anti-regime group”. In the second case, “offensive statements and propaganda against the regime”. In the third case, “causing unrest in prison and clashing with prison guards”.
Conviction: 15 years imprisonment and revocation of Iranian citizenship for his first case. 2 years imprisonment for the second case and one year for the third.


33. Nosratollah (Farzad) Khosravi-Roodsari

Date of Arrest: 2014
Date of Release: January, 2016
Nationality: Iranian- American
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Released through a prisoner swap with the U.S. Government.

 


34. Mostafa Azizi

Date of Arrest: February 1, 2015
Date of Release: April, 2016
Nationality: Iranian-Resident of Canada
Charges: Assembly and collusion against national security, propaganda against the regime, offensive statements against the Supreme Leader of Iran.
Conviction: 3 years and a fine


35. Nizar Zakka

Date of Arrest: 2015
Date of Release: June 11, 2019
Nationality: Lebanese citizen, US resident
Charges: Espionage and collaboration with hostile countries
Conviction: 10 years imprisonment and a fine of 4.2 million dollars


* 36. Siamak Namazi

Date of arrest: October 2015
Date of release:
N/A
Citizenship:
Iranian-American
Charges:
Collaborating with a hostile government (U.S.A.)
Sentence:
10 years imprisonment

 


37. Matthew Trevithick

Date of Arrest: December 8, 2015
Date of Release:
January 2016
Nationality:
American
Charges:
Espionage
Conviction:
Unknown

 


38. Sanya Bobnevich

Date of Arrest: December 13, 2015
Date of Release: January 2016
Nationality: Croatian-Swedish
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Released on bail

 


39. Kamran Ghaderi

Date of arrest: December 2015
Date of release: N/A
Citizenship: Iranian-Austrian
Charges: Espionage
Sentence: 10 years imprisonment

 


40. Bagher Namazi

Date of Arrest: March 2016
Date of Release: Spring 2019. Released due to need for medical treatment.
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Collaboration with a hostile country (U.S.A.)
Conviction: 10 years imprisonment

 


* 41. Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe

Date of Arrest: April, 2016
Date of Release: First case, March 2021. Second case, pending removal of travel ban restrictions.
Nationality: Iranian-British
Charges: First case, Collusion against the State. Second case, Propaganda against the regime.
Conviction: First case, 5 years imprisonment. Second case, 1-year imprisonment and 1-year travel ban


42. Ahmadreza Jalali

Date of Arrest: April 2016
Date of Release: N/A
Nationality: Iranian-Swedish
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: Executed

 


43. Homa Hoodfar

Date of Arrest: June 6, 2016
Date of Release: October 2016
Nationality: Iranian-Canadian
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Unknown

 


44. Reza (Rabin) Shahini 

Date of Arrest: July 15, 2016
Date of Release: April 2017
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Collaboration with Voice of America news channel (VOA) and appearance in their TV programs, propaganda against the regime in favor of anti-regime groups, membership in anti-regime groups such as the proponents of the re-establishing the monarchy in Iran, instigating people to disturb national security and offensive statements against former and current Supreme Leader of Iran.
Conviction: 18 years imprisonment, of which 9 years is enforceable. He was released on bail of 200 million tomans.


45. Afarin Neysari

Date of Arrest: July 20, 2016
Date of Release: Mid-July, 2018
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: 16 years imprisonment. Released on bail of 40 billion tomans

 


46. Karan Vafadari

Date of Arrest: July 20, 2016
Date of Release: Mid-July, 2018
Nationality: Iranian- American
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: 27 years imprisonment. Released on bail of 40 billion tomans

 


47. Xiyue Wang 

Date of Arrest: Summer 2016
Date of Release: November 2019
Nationality: Chinese-American
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: 10 years imprisonment. Released through a prisoner swap with the U.S. government in exchange for an Iranian Prisoner.

 


48. Abdolrasoul Dorri-Esfahani

Date of Arrest: August, 2016
Date of Release: Unknown
Nationality: Iranian-Canadian
Charges: Espionage and collaboration with the British Intelligence Service
Conviction: 5 years imprisonment

 


49. Anoosheh Ashoori

Date of Arrest: 2017
Date of Release: N/A
Nationality: Iranian-British
Charges: Spying for Israel and acquisition of illegitimate property
Conviction: 12 years imprisonment and fine of 33 thousand euros

 


* 50. Morad Tahbaz

Date of Arrest: January 24, 2018
Date of Release: Jailed in Evin Prison
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: 10 years imprisonment

 


51. Kavous Seyed-Emami

Date of Arrest: January 2018
Date of Release: Died in prison
Nationality: Iranian-Canadian
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: Unknown

 


52. Aras Amiri

Date of Arrest: March 2018
Date of Release: July 2021
Nationality: Iranian-British
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: 10 years imprisonment

 


53. Bahareh Amidi (Wife of Emad Sharghi)

Date of Arrest: April 4, 2018
Date of Release: 2018 (likely shortly after arrest)
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Unknown

 


54. Abbas Edalat

Date of Arrest: April 15, 2018
Date of Release: January, 2019
Nationality: Iranian-British
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Unknown

 


55. Michael White

Date of Arrest: July 1, 2018
Date of Release: June 4, 2020
Nationality: American
Charges: Offensive statements against the Supreme Leader of Iran and doxing.
Conviction: 10 years imprisonment

 


56. Kylie Moore Gilbert

Date of Arrest: Fall 2018
Date of Release: November 25, 2020
Nationality: Australian-British
Charges: Acting against national security
Conviction: 10 years imprisonment

 


57. Nelly Erin-Cambervelle

Date of Arrest: October 21, 2018
Date of Release:
February 24, 2019
Nationality:
French
Charges:
Allegedly signing an illegal mining contract
Conviction:
Unknown

 

 


58. Meimanat Hosseini-Chavoshi

Date of Arrest: November, 2018
Date of Release:
January, 2019
Nationality:
Iranian-Australian
Charges:
Collaboration with foreign countries, assembly and collusion against national security through conducting research on the decrease in birth rate
Conviction:
5 years imprisonment


59. Kamil Ahmadi

Date of Arrest: August 11, 2019
Date of Release: November 18, 2019
Nationality: Iranian-British
Charges: Acquisition of illegal wealth through collaboration with institutions hostile to the regime.
Conviction: 9 years imprisonment and a fine of 600,000 euros

 


60. Akbar Lakestani

Date of Arrest: September 28, 2019
Date of Release: November 13, 2019
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Propaganda against the regime
Conviction: Released on bail. He left the country after his release.

 


61. Ruhollah Zam

Date of Arrest: October 2019
Date of Release: Executed
Nationality: Iranian-Resident of France
Charges: Spreading corruption on earth, launching and managing the Telegram channel “Amadnews” and “Sedaye Mardom” to disturb national security, spying for Israel and another country in the region, spying for the French intelligence service, collaborating with the U.S. government, assembly and collusion to act against national security, propaganda against the regime, membership in news outlet “Saham News” to with intent to disturb national security, instigating people, gathering classified information, spreading lies, Instigating military forces of the regime to revolt and disobey, blasphemy, and acquisition of illegal properties
Conviction: Death penalty

 


* 62. Yulia Yuzik

Date of Arrest: October 3, 2019
Date of Release:
October 10, 2019
Nationality:
Russian
Charges:
Espionage
Conviction:
Detained for one week. Left Iran immediately following her release.

 


* 63. Benjamin Briere

Date of Arrest: May 2020
Date of Release: N/A
Nationality: French
Charges: Espionage and propaganda against the regime
Conviction: 8 years imprisonment

 


* 64. Reza Eslami

Date of Arrest: May 10, 2020
Date of Release: Imprisoned
Nationality: Iranian-Canadian
Charges: Collaboration with hostile countries (U.S.A.) against the Islamic Republic of Iran through participation in educational courses about the Rule of Law in Czech Republic.
Conviction: 7 years imprisonment, prohibited from teaching and leaving the country.


* 65. Jamshid Sharmahd

Date of Arrest: August 2020
Date of Release: Unknown
Nationality: Iranian-German
Charges: Unknown
Conviction: Unknown

 


* 66. Nahid Taghavi

Date of Arrest: October 16, 2020
Date of Release: N/A
Nationality: Iranian-German
Charges: Participation in forming unlawful groups and “propaganda against the regime.
Conviction: 10 years and 8 months imprisonment

 


67. Emad Sharghi

Date of Arrest: Fall 2020
Date of Release: N/A
Nationality: Iranian-American
Charges: Espionage and gathering military intelligence
Conviction: 9 years imprisonment and a fine of 600,000 euros

 


68. Tavakoli

Date of Arrest: Unknown
Date of Release: Unknown
Nationality: Dual Nationalities
Charges: Espionage
Conviction: 8 years and 6 months imprisonment

 


* 69. Habib Chaab

Date of Arrest: November 2021
Date of Release:
Unknown
Nationality:
Iranian-Swedish
Charges:
Spreading corruption on earth, leading an anti-regime group, attemptign to sabotage public and private places and planning terrorism operations, destruction of public property
Conviction:
Unknown

_________________________

For further inquiries please contact Skylar Thompson, Senior Advocacy Coordinator Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRA) at [email protected]

Seven Political Activists Sentenced to Total of 53 Years in Prison

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, political activists Nahid Taghavi, Mehran Raouf, Somayeh Kargar, Bahareh Soleimani, and Nazanin Mohammadnejad were sentenced to a total of 38 years in prison.

The other two defendants of the case, Nafiseh Malekijoo, and Mohammad Hajinia, were also sentenced in absentia. Ms. Malekijoo was sentenced to 6 years and nine months, and Mr. Hajiniya was sentenced to 8 years and eight months imprisonment.

Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran, presided by Judge Iman Afshari, has sentenced the seven defendants to a total of 53 years and five months in prison on charges of “participating and administrating the Communist Party of Iran with the intention to disrupt security”, and “propaganda activities against the regime”.

Nafiseh Malekijoo and Mohammad Hajinia are currently living abroad. As of this writing, the status of the case of Elham Samimi, the eighth defendant of the case, is unknown.

The first session of the court hearing for these activists was held on April 28, and the second session was held on June 13.

Five Political Defendants Sentenced to a Total of 38 Years in Prison

Political defendants Nahid Taghavi, Somayeh Kargar, Bahareh Soleimani, Nazanin Mohammad Nejad, and Mehran Raouf were sentenced by Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran to a total of 38 years in prison.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists,  the court hearings of these citizens, along with Ms. Elham Samimi, another defendant of this case, were held on April 28 and June 13.

Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court of Tehran, presided by Judge Iman Afshari, sentenced Nahid Taghavi and Mehran Raouf to 10 years and eight months in prison on charges of “participation in the management of an illegal group and propaganda activities against the regime”.

Somayeh Kargar and Bahareh Soleimani were sentenced to 6 years and eight months on charges of “participation in the management of an illegal group and propaganda activities against the regime”, and Nazanin Mohammad Nejad to 3 years and 4 months each on a charge of “participation in the management of an illegal group and propaganda activities against the system”. As of this writing, the status of Elham Samimi’s case is not known.

In October 2020, HRANA reported the arrest of Ms. Taghavi, Ms. Somayeh Kargar, Mr. Mehran Raouf, and Ms. Bahareh Soleimani by IRGC intelligence forces, as well as the arrests of Ms. Mohammadnejad in December and Elham Samimi in November last year. Nahid Taghavi and Mehran Raouf are still in custody.

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Nahid Taghavi and Narges Adib Facing Medical Negligence in Evin Prison

Nahid Taghavi and Narges Adib are currently facing medical negligence from authorities in Evin Prison.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Iranian-German dual citizen Nahid Taghavi has been denied medical treatment in Evin Prison despite suffering from COVID-19.

Ms. Taghavi was previously transferred to quarantine along with several prisoners with symptoms after receiving a positive COVID test. Despite the widespread prevalence of COVID-19 among inmates in the women’s ward of Evin Prison, Ms. Taghavi has not been approved for for medical leave.

Political prisoner Narges Adib, who suffers from a number of health issues, is currently being held in the women’s ward of Evin Prison as she serves out her sentence.

Ms. Adib suffers from a variety of medical problems such as respiratory distress, bronchitis, asthma, and joint pain. She was sent to the hospital for an MRI weeks ago but has not yet received test results or medication.