Two Prisoners Executed in Urmia Prison Before Supreme Court Reaches Verdict on Their Appeal

Posted on: July 7th, 2021

On Saturday, July 3, Nasser Azmoudeh and Shahriar Amiri were executed in Urmia Prison, even though the Supreme Court has not yet reached a verdict on their appeal.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, the two prisoners had previously been sentenced to death on drug-related charges.

Azmoudeh and Amiri, who had been kept in Urmia Prison since 2018, were transferred to solitary confinement the day before the execution took place.

The lack of a fair and transparent trial process in the Iranian judiciary, especially in cases that lead to irreversible sentences such as the death penalty, has long been criticized by human rights organizations. Just this week, the death sentence of a prisoner who was executed 10 months ago was overturned by the Supreme Court.

Iran ranks first in the world in citizen executions per capita, according to international organizations. The Statistics and Publication Center of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRA) reported that between January 1st and December 20th of 2020, at least 236 citizens were executed.

One of these citizens was executed publicly, and two were juvenile offenders. An additional 95 citizens were sentenced to death.

According to the report, more than 72% of executions in Iran are not reported by the government or the judiciary. Human rights organizations call these “secret executions”.

The executions of Azmoudeh and Amiri have not been announced by Iranian media or official sources as of this writing.

Jamshid Sharmahd Still Detained in Unknown Location After 10 Months

Posted on: June 7th, 2021

Iranian-German dual citizen Jamshid Sharmahd is still in detention after 10 months.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting VOA, Sharmahd’s daughter Ghazaleh stated that the Islamic regime has not allowed the lawyer selected by the family to access the case.

Per Ghazeleh’s account, case prosecutor Shah Mohammadi introduced a lawyer to her father and informed him that “only this lawyer can access the case”. Ghazaleh added, “Someone who introduced himself as ‘Dordi Zadeh, the lawyer’” has contacted the family and claimed that he will represent Mr. Sharmahd for 250 thousand dollars.

Ghazaleh Sharmahd emphasized that they cannot afford this amount.  “We do not think this Dordi Zadeh will cooperate effectively,” the daughter said. “We wanted the authorities to allow my father’s independent lawyer to access the case. Neither the consulate nor the lawyer–no one can access my father.”

In August 2020, the Iranian Ministry of Intelligence announced Sharmahd’s arrest. In 2006, Sharmahd claimed to be the leader of one of the Royal Association’s branches after Frood Fooladvand, founder of the Royal Association, disappeared in Turkey.

Sharmahd’s whereabouts and fate are unknown at the time of this writing.

Three Baha’is were Sentenced to a Total of 10 Years and 9 Months in Prison

Posted on: May 25th, 2021

Baha’i citizens Mahvash Adalati Aliabadi, Sepideh Keshavarz, and Farid Ismaili, residents of Tehran, were sentenced by Branch 36 of the Tehran Court of Appeals to a total of 10 years and 9 months in prison.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Ms. Aliabadi, Ms. Keshavarz, and Mr. Ismaili were each sentenced to three years and seven months in prison on a charge of “Acting against national security through administering the Baha’i organization”.

In their first hearing in Branch 28 of the Revolutionary Court in Tehran, presided by Judge Mohammad Reza Amouzad, Aliabadi, Keshavarz, and Ismaili, had been sentenced to 3 years and 7 months in prison on the same charge, in addition to eight months on charges of “Propaganda activities against the regime through the promotion of  Baha’ism”.

According to unofficial sources, more than 300,000 Baha’is live in Iran, but the Iranian constitution recognizes only Islam, Christianity, Judaism, and Zoroastrianism. Because their faith is not considered legitimate by authorities, the rights of Baha’is in Iran have been systematically violated for years.

This deprivation of the freedom to practice their religion is a violation of Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. The United Nations covenant holds that every person has the right to freedom of religion, freedom of converting religion, as well as freedom of expression, individually or collectively; openly or secretly.

Narges Mohammadi Sentenced to 30 Additional Months in Prison, Flogging, and Fines

Posted on: May 24th, 2021

On May 19, less than a year after completing a five year sentence and being released from Zanjan Prison, human rights activist Narges Mohammadi was sentenced by Branch 1177 of the Criminal Court in the Quds Judicial Complex in Tehran to 30 more months in prison, 80 lashes, and two fines.

In March, HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, reported that Narges Mohammadi had published an open letter in response to her latest summons to the Evin Courthouse.

“I have not attended any hearing,” Mohammadi said in the letter. “I will not accept the verdict issued by the court and I definitely will disobey.”

According to HRANA, Mohammadi is facing a slew of protest-related charges, including “Propaganda activities against the Islamic Republic of Iran through the issuance of a statement against the death penalty”,  “Sit-down strike in the prison office”, “Breaking glass”, “Libel and assault”, and “Rebelling against the prison administration who asked to end the sit-down strike”.

In December 2019, Mohammadi and seven other political prisoners in the women’s ward of Evin Prison announced in a letter that they would go on a sit-down strike in support of bereaved families who lost loved ones in November 2019 national protests. Evin Prison officials threatened to deport Mohammadi and others who participated in the strike to prisons known for their harsher conditions. She was transferred from Evin Prison to Zanjan Prison in December 2019.

After five years and six months in prison, Narges Mohammadi was finally released from Zanjan in October 2020. Mohammadi has since been denied a passport and barred from leaving the country to visit her husband and children even though her previous conviction did not mention a supplementary ban on international travel.

Whether Mohammadi’s latest sentence is carried out given her refusal to accept the charges remains to be seen.

Suleiman Karimpour Sent to Mahabad Prison to Serve out 2-Year Sentence

Posted on: May 21st, 2021

On May 18, Soleiman Karimpour, a citizen of Mahabad in the West Azerbaijan province, was sent  to Mahabad Prison on charges of “collaborating with one of the opposition parties”.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting Kurdpa,  Karimpour was sentenced by the Mahabad Revolutionary Court to two years in prison, and the confiscation of a private car. The sentence was later upheld by the Court of Appeals.

in September 2020, Suleiman Karimpour was arrested by security forces and later transferred from the IRGC Intelligence Detention Center to Mahabad Prison. He was released on bail in December 2020.

Per the report, Karimpour was denied a lawyer and family visits during his detention.

 

 

25-Year-Old Prisoner Executed in Adelabad Prison After Being Tortured and Forced to Confess

Posted on: May 19th, 2021

On May 15, 2021, an inmate in Adelabad Prison in Shiraz was executed on a charge of rape. The prisoner’s identity was confirmed by HRANA as 25-year-old Behzad Ad’l.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Ad’l  was transferred to solitary confinement for execution along with three others sentenced to death on the morning of the 15th.

In June of last year, Ad’l was arrested and sentenced to death and 99 lashes by Branch 1 of the criminal court in Fars Province, presided over by Judge Rajaeinia. The case was appealed and referred to the Supreme Court, and the previous ruling was upheld in less than 18 days.

According to an informed source, the Ad’l’s execution was carried out very hastily, despite at least 2 of his 3 plaintiffs’ agreement on the withdrawal of the sentence.   Start to finish, the  process of issuance, approval, and execution of the sentence took place over the course of less than seven months.

Ad’l did not have a lawyer.  According to the lawsuit in Branch 1 of criminal court in the Fars Province, issued in October 2020, Behzad Ad’l had stated that during interrogation he was tortured and forced to confess to the charges. If he did not cooperate, authorities threatened that his “grandmother (would) be run-over by car.”

At least three other prisoners were transferred to solitary confinement along with Mr. Ad’l for execution. The fate and identities of the other three prisoners are currently unknown.

According to international organizations, considering its population, Iran ranks first in the world in the execution of its citizens. The Statistics and Publication Center of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI) reported that between January 1st and  December 20th of 2020, at least 236 citizens were executed. One of these citizens was executed publicly, and two were juvenile offenders. An additional 95 citizens were sentenced to death.

The report states that more than 72% of executions in Iran are not reported by the government or the judiciary. Human rights organizations call these “secret executions.”

As of this writing, the execution of this prisoner has not been announced by any Iranian media or official sources.

Mehran Naruyi Executed in Isfahan After IRGC Refuses to Provide Letter of Suspension to Prison Officials

Posted on: May 19th, 2021

On May 16th, Mehran Naruyi was executed on drug-related charges in Dastgerd Prison in Isfahan, despite widespread calls to suspend the process until a fair trial could take place.

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, quoting The Baloch Activists Campaign, on May 15th, Naruyi was transferred to solitary confinement in Dastgerd Central Prison before the execution.

Per the report, an informed source said “during the prisoner’s last meeting with his family, prison officials pointed out that they would suspend the sentence if they received a letter from the imam of Isfahan and Revolutionary Guards. However, the IRGC’s Intelligence Organization refused to provide the letter.”

On May 16, 2021, Amnesty International called for an stop to the execution of Naruyi, writing: “The Iranian authorities should grant this prisoner the right to a fair trial without resorting to the death penalty, as well as forcing confessions under torture.”

According to international organizations, considering its population, Iran ranks first in the world in the execution of its citizens. The Statistics and Publication Center of the Human Rights Activists in Iran (HRAI) reported that between January 1 and December 20 of 2020, at least 236 citizens were executed. One of these citizens was executed publicly, and two were juvenile offenders. An additional 95 citizens were sentenced to death.

According to the report, more than 72% of executions in Iran are not reported by the government or the judiciary. Human rights organizations call these “secret executions.”

Mehran Naruyi, son of Khodadad, is from Nosratabad city of Zahedan in Sistan and Baluchestan province. As of this writing, this execution has not been announced by any Iranian media or official sources.

Mohammad Hosseini Ajdadi Summoned for Enforcement of Judgment

Posted on: May 11th, 2021

According to HRANA, the news agency of Human Rights Activists, Mohammad Hosseini Ajdadi, a citizen of Lahijan City in Gilan province, was summoned  for enforcement of judgment by the executive branch of the Second Criminal Court in Tehran.

In December of 2020, Hosseini Ajdadi was  unknowingly sentenced to two years in prison and a substantial fine, after his 2019 case was reopened in connection with new materials published online.

In the summer of 2019, Mohammad Hosseini Ajdadi was arrested by IRGC intelligence agents in Lahijan, on charges of “spreading lies against the country’s officials to disturb the public mind”. He was released on a 200 million Toman bail, paid for by his mother.

In December of that year, Hosseini Ajdadi was sentenced to two years in prison and fined 4 million Tomans by Branch 1037 of Tehran’s Second Criminal Court, but was later acquitted from “insulting the leadership” charges.

All steps of Mr. Hosseini Ajdadi’s latest trial took place without his presence or information. In fact, he only finally became aware of his conviction sentence while checking on the status of  judiciary paperwork for his previous summon.

It is worth noting that in 2019, Iran’s Judiciary Chief Ebrahim Raisi,  with the support of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, removed a section of Constitution requiring the presence of a defendant, plaintiff, or legal representative at appeal hearings.

Hosseini Ajdadi’s mother was informed by the Lahijan Judiciary on behalf of the Tehran Criminal Court that the bail bond will be confiscated if Mr. Ajdadi does not show up on time.